UCU/180   14 May 2009

University and College Union

Carlow Street, London, NW1 7LH   Tel 020 756 2500

To

Branch/Local Association Secretaries and Congress delegates

Topic

UCU Congress and Sector Conferences, 27 – 29 May 2009: AGENDA

Action

For debate at Congress; urgent, late motions and amendments to motions not previously circulated to be submitted by 12 noon on Thursday 21 May 2009

Summary

Motions and amendments submitted for debate at the annual meeting of UCU Congress and Sector Conferences

Contact

Catherine Wilkinson, Head of Constitution and Committees cwilkinson@ucu.org.uk

 

 

Dear Colleagues

 

UCU CONGRESS AND SECTOR CONFERENCES 2009: AGENDA

 

1        Second report of the Congress Business Committee (CBC)

 

This report from the Congress Business Committee (CBC) forms the agenda for the meetings of UCU’s Congress and Sector Conferences to be held on 27-29 May 2009 in Bournemouth. This report is being sent as part of a hard copy mailing to all delegates registered to attend Congress. In addition, a printed agenda, containing the motions set out in this report, printed alongside the relevant sections of the National Executive Committee’s report to Congress, will also be available to delegates on arrival at the conference venue.

 

2        About this report

 

Congress motions and amendments are ordered in this report to reflect the order of Congress business. All Congress motions are numbered sequentially. Motions that will be debated in the HE or FE Sector Conferences are numbered sequentially with the prefix ‘HE’ or ‘FE’. Any motions or amendments which have not been ordered into the agenda by the Congress Business Committee appear at the end of this report; such motions are sequentially numbered with the prefix ‘B’. The original text of motions which have been composited is then given, with the prefix ‘C’.

 

Where a motion appears in any part of this report attributed to more than one submitting body but not described as ‘composite’, this means that the motion was submitted in the identical form by the submitting bodies specified.

 


3       Amendments ordered into the agenda

 

At its second meeting on 8 May 2009, CBC received 54 amendments from local associations, branches, the National Executive Committee and other committees entitled to submit amendments. Amendments are printed in this report immediately after the motion that they amend, denoted by the letter ‘A’ after the number of the relevant motion.

 

Six amendments were considered by CBC to be out of order, five of these because they would materially change the policy of the motion, or were not essentially about the subject matter of the motion (amendments B20-B24) and one because it was received after the deadline for the submission of amendments (B25).  The text of these amendments appears at the end of this report.

 

One amendment, and one part of one amendment, were considered to be minor typographical corrections which in no way changed the sense of the motion; these were incorporated directly into the motions (motions 10 and HE5).

 

4        Late motions and other motions not included in CBC’s first report

 

The committee considered 22 late motions; 14 to Congress, four to the Higher Education Sector Conference and four to the Further Education Sector Conference. Four of these motions were considered not to meet the criteria for late motions and appear at the end of this report (motions B1-B4).  One late motion submitted to FE sector conference was considered to be the business of Congress and has not been ordered into the agenda (motion B13).   The remaining late motions were ordered into the agenda (motions 14, 15, 23, 34, 78, FE7 and composite motions 21, 76 and HE26).

 

The committee’s first report noted that six motions which had been submitted by the original deadline for motions were not printed in the first report and would be considered again by the committee following discussion by the NEC. In the light of the NEC’s recommendations and following further discussion within CBC, the committee have decided to print these motions. They appear as motions 31, 32, 33 and composite motion 29. 

 

Noting that these motions have not previously been circulated, CBC will accept amendments to these motions from any branch or other submitting body able to approve an amendment in the time available. Paragraphs 6 and 7 describe the process for submission of amendments to these motions, and deadline (12 noon on Thursday 21 May.)

 

One motion not ordered onto the agenda at the committee’s first meeting as being received after the deadline and over the word limit, was ordered onto the agenda (in a form meeting the word limit) after substantial further information was received from the branch (motion 41) in respect of its receipt after the deadline.

 

Branches submitting motions after the motion submission deadline should provide as much information as possible in respect of the reasons for their late submission. 

 


5        Timetable for Congress and Sector Conferences

 

The timetable for Congress and Sector Conference business appears overleaf. Fringe meetings and other evening events are also scheduled; a programme of fringe meetings will be provided to delegates.

 

6       Further submission of late motions, and amendments to motions not previously circulated

 

All motions received at UCU head office after the deadline for the submission of motions has passed are ‘late’ motions.  For CBC to accept a ‘late’ motion for ordering into the agenda it must satisfy all the following criteria (in accordance with Congress standing order 10):

 

i         it is urgent or timely and requires a decision of Congress or Sector Conference;

ii        it could not have been submitted within the prescribed time limit; and

iii       it has been approved in accordance with the standing orders of Congress and the branch/local association rules.

 

In submitting a ‘late’ motion branches/local associations must explain how the above criteria are met, including how the late motion has been approved.

 

Late motions and amendments to motions not previous circulated can be submitted by branch/local association secretaries using the on-line form at http://www.ucu.org.uk/congress . Alternatively, they can be emailed directly to congressmotions@ucu.org.uk, or sent by fax to 020 7756 2501 for the attention of Catherine Wilkinson. All late motions or amendments will be acknowledged. If you do not receive acknowledgement, please contact Catherine Wilkinson by telephone before the deadline on 020 7756 2500.

 

If CBC does not consider that the above criteria are satisfied then the motion will be printed at the end of the Congress agenda. These motions may still be taken as business by Congress or Sector Conference if a motion to do so is passed by a two-thirds majority of the relevant conference.

 

7       Late motion deadlines, and deadline for amendments to motions not previously circulated.

 

The deadline for amendments to motion which appear in this report but have not been previously circulated is 12 noon on Thursday 21 May 2009.

 

Late motions which are submitted after the amendment deadline (12 noon on 6 May) but before 12 noon on Thursday 21 May will be considered by CBC at its meeting immediately prior to Congress on 26 May, and it should be possible to circulate these motions at the start of Congress. At this point, CBC would expect only to consider motions which could not have been submitted by the amendment deadline of 6 May.

 

Motions submitted after noon on Thursday 21 May will be considered by CBC as soon as practical after their receipt. Printed circulation of these motions will be undertaken if practical. CBC would expect only to consider motions which could not have been submitted by 12 noon on 21 May.

 

Any branches and local associations needing to submit urgent late motions should do so at the earliest possible stage.

 

8        Report of the National Executive Committee to Congress

 

Motions are ordered against the paragraphs of the National Executive Committee’s report to Congress, which can be found in branch circular UCU/155 (see http://www.ucu.org.uk/congress ) Extra headings have been inserted as necessary to allow all motions to be ordered. Sections of the report have then been set out in the order in which CBC has determined business will be debated. Delegates attending Congress will receive on arrival a printed book of motions for debate ordered alongside the relevant paragraphs of NEC’s report to Congress.

 

9        Standing orders of Congress

 

The standing orders of Congress can be found at http://www.ucu.org.uk/congress .  A booklet containing UCU’s rules and Congress standing orders will be included in the mailing to all delegates registered to attend Congress.

 


UCU CONGRESS AND SECTOR CONFERENCES, 27 - 29 MAY 2009

Timetable and order of business

Unless otherwise stated, sections of business are public sessions which guests and members of the press may attend.

                    

Wednesday 27 May: Congress

 

09:30           Opening business, including:

                             Address by Sasha Callaghan, President

                             Appointment of tellers

                             Adoption of the report of the Congress Business Committee

                             Adoption of the minutes of Congress 28-30 May 2008

10:00                     Section 1: Business of the Equality Committee

12:15           Address by Fred van Leeuwen, GS Education International

12:30           Lunch (from 12:30) and fringe meetings (13:00-14:00)

14:00                     Section 2: Business of the Strategy and Finance Committee (to be taken in private session until the conclusion of motion 20)

17:00           Section 3: Business of the Education Committee

18:00           Close of first day of Congress business

 

Thursday 28 May: Further Education Sector Conference

 

09:30           Opening business, including:

Welcome

Appointment of tellers

Adoption of the report of the Congress Business Committee

Adoption of the minutes of the FE sector conference 29 May 2008, and special FE sector conference September 2008

09:45           Formula for the election of national negotiators for FE in England

including motion FE1

Annual Report from the National Head of FE.

10:15           Consideration of motions

11:55           Address by Rachel Curley, National Head of Equality

12:10           Address by Palestinian speaker (tbc) (Joint session of HE and FE delegates)

12:30           Lunch (from 12:30) and fringe meetings (13:00-14:00)

14:00           Consideration of motions (continued)

18:00                    Close of sector conference

 

 


Thursday 28 May: Higher Education Sector Conference

 

09:30           Opening business, including:

Welcome

Appointment of tellers

Adoption of the report of the Congress Business Committee

Adoption of the minutes of the HE sector conference 29 May 2008, and special HE sector conference November 2008

10:00           Consideration of motions

12:10           Address by Palestinian speaker (tbc) (Joint session of HE and FE delegates)

12:30           Lunch (from 12:30) and fringe meetings (13:00-14:00)

14:00           Consider of motions (continued)

15:00           Address by Rachel Curley, National Head of Equality

15:15           Consideration of motions (continued)

18:00                    Close of sector conference

 

 

Friday 29 May: Congress

 

09:30           Section 4: Other employment related business

10:30           Address by Sally Hunt, General Secretary

10:45           Section 5: Rules changes (to be taken in private session)

12:30           Lunch (from 12:30) and fringe meetings (13:00-14:00)

14:00                    Section 6: Business of the Recruitment, Organising and Campaigning Committee

16:45                     Closing business, including

                   Election results

                   Introduction of new president

17:00           Close of business


UCU CONGRESS 2009: MOTIONS FOR DEBATE

 

Paragraph headings refer to those of the NEC report to Congress which will be set out in the printed agenda that will be available for delegates to collect on arrival at Congress. The report is also available as UCU/155.

 

 

SECTION 1: BUSINESS OF THE EQUALITY COMMITTEE

Introduction and Single Equality Bill (paragraphs 1-3)

1        Composite (Northumbria University, National Executive Committee)

The Economic Recession and the Equality Agenda

Congress notes the danger that economic recession can be exploited to attack equal rights won by women and ethnic minority groups.

It notes with concern that job losses in the public sector, retail, hotels and catering may particularly affect women and minority ethnic groups.

Congress notes that job losses in the education sector will threaten access to and the quality of education.

It condemns any scapegoating of asylum seekers, ethnic minorities and women and any political propaganda that attempts to blame oppressed groups for the economic crisis.

It particularly opposes attempts by far right groups such as the British National Party to exploit and build upon low morale in communities and reaffirms UCU commitment to Unite Against Fascism.

Congress commits itself to vigilant defence of UCU’s equality agenda and of equal rights achieved to date.

1A.1  Academic-Related Committee

Add at end:

Furthermore, Congress believes that the Government could do much to reduce inequality in wages and conditions by implementing the European Directives on Fixed-term, Part-time and Temporary (Agency) work in the best interests of workers rather than employers, and by bringing in 'day one' employment rights for all workers. Congress requests the NEC to work with the TUC to bring about these changes before a new government seeks to reverse any improvements in employees' rights.

2        University of Manchester         Equality Impact Assessment

This Congress notes with concern that UCU has failed to challenge universities and colleges on the Full Impact Assessment results on Gender Pay Gap, Race equality, LGBT, Disabilities. After seven years, Universities and Colleges should not be allowed to simply publish statistics that are not backed up by positive actions. This Congress therefore urges the National UCU Executive Committee to take the necessary steps to name and shame Universities and Colleges which have not been compliant with legislation. UCU should also empower regional offices and the legal service department to put the Trade Union ethos before the cost to set the milestones and to challenge discrimination, bullying and harassment.

2A.1 LGBT Members’ Standing Committee

Delete: last two sentences (from ‘positive action’.)

Add:

Research and resources have been produced about sexual orientation strands.  Conducting impact assessments is useful in industrial relations bargaining.  To support all branches in negotiating for equality implementation Congress calls for the Equality Unit to produce an all-inclusive resource and distribute it to all branches along with related training across regions open to all members.

2A.2 National Executive Committee

Delete first sentence. Replace with:

“Congress notes the work UCU has done to promote the implementation of the race, gender and disability duties including the production of the comprehensive equality duties toolkit .

Congress notes with concern the lack of progress Colleges and Universities have made in implementing this legislation including impact assessments.”

Delete last sentence. Replace with:

“UCU Congress believes the full implementation of the public sector duties should be a key priority for the UCU Equality Unit and UCU regions.”

3        LGBT Members’ Standing Committee          Defence of LGBT Equality

Congress notes that in recent years there have been challenges to LGBT anti-discrimination laws using alternative laws which uphold freedom of religious belief and practice.

Congress supports the free expression of religious belief but is adamant that "Freedom of Religion" should never be hijacked and used as a pretext to discriminate against LGBT people, or used to erode or ignore LGBT anti-discrimination legislation.

Congress resolves to lobby the EHRC and the Government to ensure that LGBT anti-discrimination legislation is maintained, protected and expanded without erroneous challenge based on freedom of religious belief and practice. 

4        North West Regional Committee        Anti-Fascist Campaigning

Congress notes the success of the united anti-fascist movement in the UK relative to several other European countries in restricting the growth of fascist organisations.  It is rightly proud of the role of UCU and its predecessors in initiating and supporting this united movement.

It notes, however, that the severe economic crisis and accompanying political turmoil provides unprecedented opportunities for the BNP to peddle nationalist and racist solutions and make serious political advances.

As the leading post-school educational union, we recognise our special responsibility in combating the growth of fascist ideas amongst young people.

Congress resolves to:

1.    Continue to prioritise anti-fascist activity;

2.    Provide maximum encouragement to our members in this vital area;

3.    Work with the UAF, fellow trade unions, the NUS and other organisations to combat the threat from fascist organisations.

Disability (paragraphs 4-6)

5       Disabled Members’ Standing Committee     Disabled People and Welfare Reform

Congress notes:

·          that disabled people are amongst the first casualties of the current economic crisis.

·          this government’s decision to coerce over a million disabled people into low paid, casualised work.

·          Congress deplores the government’s welfare reform agenda including the transfer of Job Centre plus employment services for disabled people to private, third sector and faith-based organisations, savage cuts in the Independent Living Fund and the continuing threat to remove Access to Work from disabled people working in the public sector.

Congress resolves to:

a)  continue our campaign against the privatisation of public services, including initiatives to support disabled people into work

b) support the TUC lobby of Parliament to protect Access to Work

c)   press the Government to restore  the entitlement to ILF funding to all disabled people.

d) support local and national  campaigns to oppose attacks on services to disabled people.

Race (paragraphs 7-11)

6        Black Members’ Standing Committee

Impact of redundancies/Equality Impact Assessments/Institutional Racism

Congress notes with great concern that many HE/FE institutions have relegated the Equality Agenda to a set of online policies that do not demonstrate a proactive approach to good race equality relations.  These institutions have failed to conduct an equality impact assessment of policies and procedures - that have had and continue to have a disproportionately adverse impact on Black members – and continue to act in breach of the RRAA 2000, right under the noses of Trade Unions, HEFCE and the CEHR.

Congress calls for:

·          formal challenge of HE/FE institutions to conduct a full equality impact assessment of their policies and procedures as required and publish the results

·          UCU should name-shame institutions that fulfil/do not this particular statutory duty

·          institutions to recognise institutional racism and set targets for eliminating inequality in recruitment, restructuring, redundancies, unemployment, and career development on a regular basis

7        National Executive Committee           Campaigning Against Anti-Semitism

Congress agrees to instruct the NEC to: 

·          Produce a series of leaflets about the dangers of anti-Semitism and holocaust denial on campus and distribute them to members.

·          Organise a one-day event about the dangers of anti-Semitism in London in January 2010 to coincide with Holocaust Memorial Day and repeat it at 3 other locations.

·          To organise an event with other education unions on Holocaust Memorial Day each year subsequently, which both commemorates the different groups targeted by the Nazis and looks at how we can campaign against racism and fascism today.

·            To organise a fringe meeting on anti-semitism at Congress 2010.

·            To work together with NUS and the other unions on this programme of work, as well as developing further campaigning activities.

7A.1  University College London

Add new first line:

'Congress notes with concern the rise of anti-Semitism in the UK and resignations of UCU members apparently in connection with perceptions of institutional anti-Semitism.

Add new final bullet point:  ' To investigate the number of recent UCU resignations and the reasons for them, and to report its findings to next Congress.'

8        National Executive Committee           Secularism

Congress believes that universities and colleges should be predominantly secular in character, respecting the rights of those who practise a faith and those who do not:

·         They should make appropriate provision for religious observance by those staff and students who practise a faith, and they should provide secular space to respect the rights of those who do not.

·         To be inclusive, university and college ceremonies and public events should be secular in form.

·         Equality auditing in respect of religion and belief should include checking that the rights of non-believers are respected.

Congress supports academic freedom and the advancement of science. This must include the right to challenge and debate religious beliefs and to prioritise scientific explanations in the teaching of science.

Congress supports a comprehensive equality agenda. It does not accept religious belief as a justification for sexist or heterosexist behaviour or discrimination against disabled people.

LGBT (paragraphs 12-15)

9        LGBT Members’ Standing Committee          Equality Resources

Noting the publication Lesbian and Gay Rights at Work the UCU sexual orientation equality checklist, and other sector resources, Congress calls upon the NEC to support branches and all regions to

ensure that these resources are disseminated;

review the state of use in branches and regions, pro actively seeking opportunities to work with branches and institutions for the implementation of these 

organise and deliver training on sexual orientation and gender identity open to all members, across all regions, and build regional networks to provide peer support to develop these equality areas

commission the production of a series of posters and events promoting LGBT people who are also Black (BME) and / or disabled; plus accompanying resource packs which can be used during LGBT and Black History Months, the Holocaust Memorial Day etc.

These should be made available to all branches and regions throughout the UK.

Age (paragraph 16)

10      Northern Region Retired Members      Representation of the Elderly

Congress notes the Governmental appointment of Joan Bakewell as the Voice of Older People as a non event as she does not share the life experience of the great majority of older people and thus is not able to adequately represent pensioners and older people as a whole throughout our nation. Consequently Congress calls on UCU to seek the appointment of a Parliamentary Commissioner to represent the Elderly.

Gender (paragraphs 17-19)

11      Women’s Standing Committee          End Violence Against Women

Congress notes:

The incidence of violence against women is on the increase in the UK.

Much of this violence is hidden and includes sexist bullying and harassment. This issue affects not just women members, but the student population as well. There are no specific work policies to deal with these problems. This issue tends to get little attention.

Congress resolves to:

·          Affiliate to the End Violence Against Women organisation

·          Formulate a model UCU policy, including impact assessment for sickness policies

·          Formulate practical advice for branches/LAs

·          Disseminate good practice

·          Training for members

11A.1 Women Members’ Standing Committee

In bullet point one, add at the end, ‘and to Object’.

Parental leave (new heading after paragraph 24)

12     University of Aberdeen  Equality of parental leave rights

Congress calls on the Executive to call on government, funding bodies and universities to:

(a) ensure that uniform parental leave entitlement is provided, ensuring that leave can be taken without fear of adversely affecting career prospects/opportunities;

(b) ensure that staff are entitled and encouraged to take the period of parental leave that best suits their family circumstances, without pressure relating to their workplace;

(c) ensure funding is provided for contracts to be extended commensurate with the period of parental leave taken;

(d) be pro-active in promoting workplace gender equality, implementing policies ahead of the minimum requirements of legislation;

(e) and for wider recognition that parental leave is not merely a women’s issue – fathers’ rights should be highlighted and we seek the extension of male parental leave rights as a means of fostering genuine gender equality in all areas of life. 


 

SECTION 2, BUSINESS OF THE STRATEGY AND FINANCE COMMITTEE

To be taken in private session until the conclusion of motion 20

Finance and property (paragraphs 1-4)           

13      National Executive Committee       Audited Financial Statements

Congress receives the union’s audited financial statements for the 12-month period ending 31 August 2008 as set out in UCU/168.

14      National Executive Committee          Subscription rates

Congress endorses the subscription rates from 1 September 2009 set out in UCU/178.

15      National Executive Committee Budget 2009-2010

Congress endorses the budget for September 2009 – August 2010 as set out in UCU/178.                                                                                                     

 

 

16      National Executive Committee       Appointment of Auditors

Congress approves the provisional appointment of Knox Cropper as the union’s auditors for the year ending 31 August 2010.      

17      Richmond upon Thames College       Strike Fund and Strike Pay

Congress believes that strike pay could be crucial to winning important disputes. Congress therefore agrees:
• To establish a permanent strike fund;
• A minimum 1% of all members’ subscriptions will be paid into this fund;
• £1 million minimum will be kept in this fund till it is drawn upon;
• A minimum £1 million will be re-established in the strike fund rapidly whenever the fund is drawn upon;
• Strike pay will be £50.00 a day;
• All these figures will be reviewed annually by Congress;
• This fund will be used for strike pay purposes only;
• The NEC will agree when strike pay will be paid.

18      London Regional Committee   Sustentation Fund

Congress believes that in order to mount an effective campaign to improve pay and conditions, it is necessary for our union to be able to provide financial support for members who are called upon to take strike action. Congress instructs the NEC to ensure that one million pounds is always available in the sustentation fund.

19      University of Brighton Eastbourne and South East Regional Committee

          Sustentation and Sustentation Fund

          Congress recognises that

·          political and economic instability, and FE/HE financial disruption, will increase defensive industrial action;

·          action creates disproportionate hardship, and a hardship fund must be considered in all disputes;

·          use of the Sustentation Fund for national disputes, or for the first three days of industrial action, is unsustainable financially, and undesirable politically;

·          industrial action cannot become dependant on availability of sustentation.

Congress endorses the key conditional Guidelines of the SFC for the payment of sustentation outside exceptional circumstances:

·          a rate of £30 per day;

·          where members have already lost three days’ pay;

·          for disputes of strategic importance.

Congress instructs the NEC to investigate the:

·          increase of subscription allocations to the Fund from 1% to 2%;

·          introduction of an hypothecated increase of subscriptions;

·          building a tradition of, and infrastructure for, regional levies and strike collections across the sectors for regional disputes.

Legal services (paragraph 6)

20     Kingston on Thames University  Membership entitlement to UCU support in individual casework

The UCU policy on a new member’s entitlement to casework support by Branch Officers and Regional Officials should be clearly stated on membership application forms. These should make clear that no casework support will normally be provided to new members who have joined after they became aware that they were facing action from line managers, colleagues or students which requires UCU support. This is necessary to deter ‘freeriders’ and to reduce the burden on branch Officers and Regional Officials.

Public affairs (paragraphs 7- 14)

 

21     Composite (Northern Regional Committee; University of Leeds; East Midlands Regional Committee; Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee)

          United Campaign Against Police Violence

Congress notes:
1. The tragic death of Ian Tomlinson on 1 April after he was pushed to the floor by police involved in the G20 demonstrations.
2. There have been numerous complaints against police violence and restrictions on recent demonstrations, including 'kettling'.
3. Many families who have lost loved ones at the hands of the police are involved in long campaigns for justice.
4. The formation of the United Campaign Against Police Violence (UCAPV), set up around the slogans, 'Remember Ian Tomlinson', 'No more deaths in police custody', 'Freedom to protest' and 'Defend civil liberties'.

Congress believes:
1. Evidence suggests that aggressive police behaviour is not the result of individual officers, but is an institutional issue.
2. There is a need for a broad-based active campaigning strategy around these questions.

Congress resolves:
1. To support UCAPV and future actions it is involved with.
2. To affiliate to UCAPV at a cost of £100.

European and international work (paragraphs 19-28)

22     Northern Regional Committee          

Economic Development and the Lisbon Treaty

In light of the current economic crisis and the need for direct government intervention in the economy to support our manufacturing industry, UCU Congress calls on the government to work for the repeal of the Lisbon Treaty and specifically those sections of it which:

·          give legal primacy to the free market and competition

·          make state aid illegal

·          give the EU Commission sole control over trade

·          guarantee capital freedom of movement

·          remove the democratic freedom of the parliaments of the member states to develop programmes of economic recovery involving comprehensive strategic planning and the public ownership of utilities.

22A.1 Manchester Metropolitan University

Add following paragraph to end of motion:

‘Congress demands that a campaign against the Lisbon Treaty should be based on principles of international solidarity and reject nationalist slogans such as ‘British jobs for British workers’, which fuel racism and give succour to Europe’s fascist parties like the BNP.’

23      National Executive Committee  Colombia

Congress believes that the systematic criminalisation of trade unionists by the Uribe government and its agents should be condemned.

Congress further believes that the forced removals of people from their land and terrorisation of the poor is a fundamental attack on their human rights.

Congress supports the call for a political solution, the release of those kidnapped, and a cessation of violence

Congress agrees to:

·       establish rapid links with Colombian academic unions to provide support when their members are threatened

·       maintain pressure on the British government to withdraw aid not specifically for human rights work

·       offer support to JfC staff members targeted by Colombian intelligence services

·       encourage local branches and LAs to affiliate to JfC

·       work with JfC to formulate a motion to TUC Congress to confirm our opposition to any free trade agreement resulting from the EU-Colombia negotiations held in May 2009

24     Composite (National Executive Committee; Westminster-Kingsway College;  Derwentside College)  Solidarity with Palestinians

Congress condemns the recent military attacks on Gaza. The continuing blockade of the Gazan people and the occupation of the West Bank highlight the importance of international union solidarity with the Palestinian people. Congress also condemns the use of rockets against Israeli civilians.

Congress endorses the actions of the General Secretary and SFC in relation to the implementation of Motion 25 from Congress 2008.

We welcome the progress on twinning and exchanges with international post-school education unions and institutions including those in Palestine and support the continuation of this solidarity work and other solidarity work within the law. We note the success of twinning in raising awareness of the ongoing military occupation in the West Bank and the blockade of Gaza.

We welcome the role of such groups as Camben-Abu Dis Friendship Association in building such links between educational institutions here and in the occupied territories. We call on UCU to affiliate to the national twinning campaign.

Congress also notes that 29th November is designated annual United Nations International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People and instructs the NEC to promote activities in the branches – both curricular and non-curricular – to mark this day.

24A.1 London School of Economics

Add after paragraph 3
Congress instructs the NEC to collect information on Palestinian academics prevented from travelling abroad to conferences or visiting positions; on overseas academics refused permission to take up, or remain in, positions in Palestine; and on students who have places in overseas universities that they are unable to take up through travelling restrictions and
publicise the information;
inform Education International; and
press the Israeli Government to allow freedom of movement for Palestinian academics and students.

25     Disabled Members’ Standing Committee      Disabled People and Conflict

Congress notes that armed conflict is one of the biggest causes of impairment globally and that hundreds of thousands of people are injured and impaired annually due to wars.

Congress is appalled by the recent conflict in Gaza which has resulted in the deaths, injury and impairment of over a thousand people, including 300 children and countless others.

Congress resolves to support practical initiatives to show solidarity with disabled people and their organisations in Palestine.

26      UCU Scotland        Palestine and Israel

UCU Congress welcomes the visit of the President of UCU Scotland to Palestine and Israel as part of an STUC delegation in March 2009.  Congress agrees to disseminate his report as widely as possible to members. 

UCU Congress welcomes the campaign amongst students in Scottish HEIs for disinvestment from arms companies such as British Aerospace and congratulates Dundee and Strathclyde’s victories in this respect.

 

27      Black Members’ Standing Committee          Gaza

Congress strongly condemns the Israeli invasion in Gaza. Over 1300 children and women were massacred and over 5000 people were seriously injured.  Indiscriminate killings, attacks and destruction of educational institutions, UN properties, hospitals and infrastructure in Gaza amount to crime against humanity.

Congress strongly condemns the use of banned substances, white phosphorus and depleted uranium on defenceless people.  

The Congress strongly condemns the BBC and much of the Western media for biased reporting of the atrocities committed against civilians by the Israeli Army. Also the UN and countries that vacillated and allowed the army time to destroy the infrastructure of Gaza.

Congress demands:

·          Ending of apartheid and lifting of all barricades in Gaza

·          Recognition of the democratically elected Gaza government 

·          Establishment of Free Independent Palestine

·          Respect for human rights in Palestine

·          Stop killing of defenceless Gazans

·          Israel tried for human rights violations

·          Lasting peace in Palestine.

28     Composite (Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee, North West Regional Committee)  Gaza

Congress notes:

1.     The deaths, injuries and destruction caused by the Israeli government’s assault on Gaza.

2.     The sale of over £18.8 million of British arms to Israel in 2008, up from £7.5 million in 2007

Congress condemns:

1.     The Israeli attack on Gaza and refusals by the US and UK governments to condemn it

2.     The total support for Israel by the US government

3.     The siege of Gaza by the Israeli government in breach of international law.

Congress resolves:

1.     To congratulate student unions who have occupied and protested over Gaza

2.     To call for an immediate lifting of the siege

3.     To demand the British government end its complicity in denying Palestinian rights

4.     To demand the British government bans arms sales and economic support for Israel

5.     To support self-determination for the Palestinian people

6.     To call for a ban on imports of all goods from the illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied Territories

7.     To demand the British government expels the Israeli ambassador

8.     To donate to the special Stop the War fund for Gaza.

Amendment 28A.1: The union received advice from Leading Counsel that to pass this amendment would be unlawful because it is likely to be viewed by a court as a call to boycott Israeli academic institutions. The union has previously followed advice from Leading Counsel that such a call would be outside the powers of the union to make. If the amendment is further amended to remove the affirmation of support for the Palestine call for a boycott, disinvestment and sanctions campaign, Leading Counsel has advised the union may lawfully pass this amendment. If the amendment is passed in its unamended form the President has been advised that she will have to treat it as being void and of no effect.

28A.1 North West Regional Committee

Add at end:

‘Congress affirms support for the Palestinian call for a boycott, disinvestment and sanctions campaign.’

Motion 29: The union received advice from Leading Counsel that to pass this motion would be unlawful because it is likely to be viewed by a court as a call to boycott Israeli academic institutions. The union has previously followed advice from Leading Counsel that such a call would be outside the powers of the union to make. If the motion is amended to remove the affirmation of support for the Palestine call for a boycott, disinvestment and sanctions campaign, Leading Counsel has advised the union may lawfully pass this motion. If the motion is passed in its unamended form the President has been advised that she will have to treat it as being void and of no effect.

29     Composite (University of Brighton Grand Parade, College of North East London, University of East London)

Congress notes:

·          targeting by Israel of civilians, homes, hospitals, UN facilities, university and school buildings to overthrow a democratically elected government;

·          blockade of medicine, food, fuel, trade and education of Gaza, and continued occupation and settlement of the West Bank;

·          complicity of Israeli educational institutions in colonisation and military preparation;

·          student occupations globally demanding justice and solidarity.

Congress believes:

·         a solution is impossible until Israel dismantles illegal settlements, withdraws to 1967 borders, and negotiates with Hamas;

·         international pressure is necessary to force Israel to abide by international law.

Congress affirms support for the Palestinian call for a boycott, disinvestment and sanctions campaign.

Congress resolves to:

·         intensify solidarity and renew urgently its call to members to reflect on the moral and political appropriateness of collaboration with Israeli educational institutions;

·         Support those Israelis who refuse to collaborate with Israel’s war against Palestinians

·         Demand that the British Government condemn Israeli aggression and ban arms sales to Israel

·         host an Autumn international, inter-union conference of BDS supporters to investigate implementation of the strategy, including an option of institutional boycotts.

 

Points based system for immigration (new heading after paragraph 28)

30     Composite (West Midlands Regional Committee, National Executive Committee, Academic-related Staff Committee)   Points Based System for Immigration

Congress strongly condemns the Points Based System for Immigration, which requires international staff and students to carry biometric ID cards and institutions to monitor them, report absences to the Home Office and check biometric data bases.

Under the PBSI, HE and FE Institutions are mandated to have a UK Border Agency sponsor’s licence effectively making them agents of the Home Office.

As a result individual UCU members (both academic and academic-related) will be required to carry out policing and surveillance duties on behalf of the Home Office. Individuals could be liable to substantial fines and possible jail sentences for failure to comply.

This UK Border Agency-directed policy will impose additional workloads on UCU members and will ride roughshod over any individual’s moral objections to collaborating in such distasteful surveillance activities

Colleges and Universities are being forced to police the movement of international students and staff – or lose the ability to recruit internationally. International staff and students form an essential part of world class teaching and research. This system makes educators into immigration snoopers which could damage UK education irreparably.

Congress believes PBSI is:

1. Discriminatory and an attack on the civil liberties of international staff and students.

2. Likely to lead to draconian absence and sickness policies being introduced and members being disciplined if they do not report absences of international staff and students.

3. Likely to severely damage the international status, and quality of education and research in institutions due to the loss of overseas staff and students.

4.  Counter to our core values of academic freedom and equality.

5.   Not part of our duties.

Congress deplores this pandering to anti-immigration racism and agrees to:

·           Campaign against the implementation of the points-based immigration system

·           Lobby Government to explain the detrimental impact on key sectors

·           Lobby all relevant bodies and individuals to secure short-term amendments of PBSI legislation to ensure that UCU members are released from the existing requirements to act as unpaid and unconsulted agents of the UK Border Agency,

·           Instruct the NEC to campaign jointly with S/TUC, NUS, employers, and other organisations to put pressure on the government to repeal this legislation.

·           Work with all relevant groups to continue the campaign against ID cards

30A.1 University of Liverpool

To add as a bullet point after the last bullet point in section 5:

‘The UCU immediately launching a campaign of non-compliance with all such policing and surveillance duties (including recording details from foreign national students; supplying personal details to other institutions in our capacity as external examiners, assessors and lecturers; and refusal to request such details on behalf of our own institutions from external examiners, assessors and lecturers).
The UCU will give unqualified support to any member disciplined or victimised as a result of this campaign.’

30A.2 North West Regional Committee

Add at end:

‘Congress agrees to assist branches in supporting members in their refusal to monitor or track international students and staff.’

30A.3 Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee

          Add at end of motion:

‘UCU will provide all possible support for any member who refuses to implement the processes of the PBSI.’

31      University of Brighton, Falmer          Points based immigration

Congress condemns the points based immigration system –

·          monitoring and tracking international staff and students is implicitly racist, undermines civil liberties, and could produce draconian absence and sickness policies;

·          biometric ID cards for international staff and students is a backdoor route to their general introduction;

·          losing students could threaten the survival of many educational institutions;

·          employees could face intimidation for refusing to monitor or inform on colleagues.

Congress agrees to:

·          campaign with others against this system, and to monitor its impact;

·          advise members that they are not contracted as immigration officers of the Borders Agency or informants for the Special Branch;

·          to assist branches in supporting members in their refusal to monitor or track international staff and students;

·          write to principals and vice-chancellors encouraging them publicly to oppose to this xenophobic and proto-racist measure;

·          intensify the recruitment of international staff eligible for membership;
urge the TUC to condemn this system.

32     National Executive Committee

The campaign against Points Based Immigration

Congress strongly condemns points based immigration and believes PBI is against our core values of academic freedom and equality.

Congress instructs NEC to

1.  Campaign jointly with TUC, NUS, employers, and other organisations to put pressure on the government to repeal this legislation. 

2.  Make public statements opposing PBI.

3.  Submit a motion to TUC condemning PBI and asking TUC and its affiliates to join the campaign.

4. Directly inform all members of UCU policy on PBI, encouraging them to use passive resistance and other creative and legal acts of non-participation to show that the system is unworkable.

5.  To encourage branches to ballot to boycott PBI.

6.  Organise a national demonstration and lobby of parliament and encourage a sympathetic MP to put up a private member’s bill

7.  Produce campaigning resource materials for branches and actively recruit international staff and students.

33     Goldsmiths University of London  Opposition to new Home Office regulations on international students

We wish to express our opposition to the new Home Office regulations that require staff to monitor the attendance of international students. We are opposed to these regulations for the following reasons.

First, they represent a possible breach of Article 8 (right to privacy) and Article 3 (degrading treatment) of the ECHR and the 1998 Human Rights Act.

Second, such regulations will harm the relationship of trust between students and lecturers. The regulations treat international students as potential suspects who have come to the UK with the specific goal of abusing the immigration system.

Third, the work involved in monitoring international students will add unnecessarily to our workloads.

Congress agrees

1. To reaffirm its opposition to the new Home Office regulations
2. To ask members not to commence implementation of these regulations until the human rights and workload issues that arise from the new regulations are appropriately dealt with.

Rules and standing orders (paragraph 29)

34     South East Regional Committee   Discontinuation of Honorary Membership

Congress is concerned:

(a) about the NEC decision that it would not seek to make any recommendations for Honorary Membership this year or in the future on the basis of service to the union as this is a misinterpretation of Rule 3.1.3;

(b) that this year nominations have not been considered at all;

(c) that this has created embarrassment for nominees that have been put forward this year but not considered;

(d) that this may have created a precedent whereby the NEC has, in
effect, altered a rule without putting a rule change to Congress.

Congress therefore instructs the NEC to:

(i) make arrangements to consider those nominations for
Honorary Membership put forward this year;

(ii) facilitate a full consultation with its members about the principle of Honorary Membership and how any such Honorary Membership could be awarded;

(iii) bring appropriate rule changes to Congress 2010.

 

SECTION 3: BUSINESS OF THE EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Adult learning (paragraphs 3-4)

35     Open University   ELQ Cuts

Congress reiterates its opposition to the government's policy of not funding institutions for students studying courses at a level equivalent to or lower than a qualification they already hold (ELQ). This policy is inconsistent with the government's proclaimed commitment to lifelong learning and has a particular impact on institutions which have done most to promote adult and / or part time education, and to widen participation. Especially in the current economic climate, it is more important than ever that obstacles are not placed in the way of those wishing to return to higher education in order to refresh or broaden their education, irrespective of their previous qualification level.

Congress pledges to work in alliance with other bodies in the sector, including student organisations and the universities themselves, and through the auspices of the Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning among other avenues, to reverse this fundamentally flawed policy.

The union’s vision of education (paragraph 5)

36      Lambeth College   Democratic Accountability and User Involvement

Democratic accountability and user involvement have declined alongside recent funding and policy changes and the marketisation of education.
This Congress agrees to research and campaign against the erosion of accountability in further and higher education, alongside other unions.

37     Doncaster College 

Persistent failure of leadership and management at Doncaster College

This Congress calls upon central government to investigate proposals by management at Doncaster College in the light of successive failures of leadership and management within the institution.
Current plans include increased class sizes, threats to over 300 jobs, replacing experienced, qualified lecturers by assessors, increased pressure on all through maximised and excessive staff utilisation coupled with redundancy or redeployment of tutors with leadership roles.
What assurances are there that these cuts will not affect the quality of the education and skills available to the community of Doncaster?

Academic freedom (paragraph 6)

38     National Executive Committee          

         On-line learning, intellectual property and academic freedom

Congress notes the rapid increase in various forms of online learning and the fact that this development is often driven by cost-cutting and commercial considerations rather than by sound educational principles and practice.  Congress also notes developments in the dissemination of academic research and publications through electronic means.

These trends have major implications for UCU members as teachers, scholars and researchers whether in further, adult or higher education.  They impact on them professionally and also on their intellectual property rights and academic freedom.

Congress instructs the NEC in liaison with the education and other appropriate committees to promote discussion of these areas as widely as possible among members, with a view to issuing up to date policy statements and advice.

 

 

Education and the recession (paragraph 7)

39      National Executive Committee          Education and recession

Congress notes with grave concern the impact of the economic recession, particularly the massive increase in unemployment.  UCU members have a vital role to play in the provision of education to improve the quality of people’s lives and their future prospects whether in work or leisure, as well as contributing to the understanding and analysis of the profound social, economic and political impact of the current crisis.

However, Congress believes that the ability of our members to meet these challenges is undermined by inadequate and inflexible funding and by the government’s narrow focus on skills and its reliance on employer-led demand and marketisation.

Congress calls on the NEC to promote vigorously the union’s alternative vision of education and to campaign to increase political and public awareness of the fact that that now is the time for renewed investment in, and wider access to, high quality education and training for all.

39A.1 University of Edinburgh

Add at the end:

This should include high quality and well funded second-chance and access programmes in further and higher education to help lift out of unemployment and casual low-paid work those whose initial education was limited or unsuccessful.

39A.2 East Midlands Regional Committee

Add: (at the end of the motion)

Congress further notes the call by the NUT national congress to call for a co-ordinated trade union demonstration over the impact of the recession on education and on youth unemployment.

Congress resolves that such a demonstration should be organised to coincide with the Labour Party Congress in Brighton in October 2009

 

SECTION 4: OTHER EMPLOYMENT RELATED MATTERS

 

Health and safety (paragraphs 1-4)

40      Blackburn College          Strengthening the Health and Safety Agenda

This Congress welcomes the progress over the last two years in strengthening the health and safety work of our union.  UCU has more trained H&S reps, provides better advice for members and has become more involved as a union in the broader H&S movement.

However complacency would be very dangerous.  The government’s systematic underfunding of Health and Safety regulation is undermining safety standards across the UK, while financial strictures will inevitably encourage educational institutions to deprioritise our members’ health, safety and welfare.

The results of recent membership surveys show the urgent need to build on the progress already made.  Congress resolves to:

·         Establish a small national committee to drive forward the union’s H& S work

·         Raise awareness among our members on H&S

·         Encourage the establishment of safety reps’ networks at workplace/regional levels

·         Use the opportunities afforded by the SRSC regulations to build the union.

41      NESCOT  Bullying in Colleges and Universities

Congress notes with concern, the rise in cases of accusations of bullying against lecturers and the increased use of bullying policies by management against lecturers, and their representatives.

Congress instructs the NEC to

1. Immediately investigate and monitor the current situation in FE and HE. In particular reviewing how policies on bullying can often ignore any form of natural justice by allowing evidence from anonymous accusers.

2. To develop a policy of support for members, to help them clear their names, and help them take to court their accusers.

3. To immediately review the support given to those lay officers who are harassed, bullied and victimised by college managements.

4. To review the regional support that is given to officers and their branch in fighting such attacks.

42      Composite (National Executive Committee)                  Stress

Congress is disturbed, but not surprised, at the unacceptably high stress levels found by the 2008 UCU Stress Survey Reports. The HSE questionnaire shows HE, FE and PE respondents fall far below the HSE "aspirational benchmark" of well-being on the factors of: Demands; Control; Managerial Support; Peer Support; Relationships; Role; Change.

Congress instructs the Executive:

1)     to publicise the results, including their use in recruitment;

2)     to take appropriate action, including at regional level, to assist Branches to press effectively to reduce stress levels, and to increase well-being on each of the HSE factors. These actions may include

a)  Publicising and distributing the Stress Toolkit;

b)  Developing “best practice” models based on successful initiatives to fight stress;

c)  A pilot campaign focussing on institutions with high stress levels;

d)  Action on workloads.

3)   to carry out surveys at regular intervals, and to report back to Congress to chart progress.

Environmental work (paragraph 6)

43      South Thames College            Environment 

This Congress recognises the importance of the UCU increasing its profile on environmental issues.

In particular with:

1.    Employers – Improving environment management in the workplace

2.    Staff – Identifying opportunities to raise employee awareness

3.    Students – Linking with campaign organisations like People and Planet

4.    Sector bodies – Strengthening links with bodies like HEFCE, EAUC, and Government departments to develop policy in areas like ‘greening the curriculum’

5.    Public – Supporting campaigns that strengthen the profile of the trade union movement in relation to ‘anti-environment measures’ like Heathrow expansion

UCU will need to:

1.    Promote the role of UCU environment reps and seek formal recognition within institutions

2.    Provide environment courses in the 2009-10 reps training programme

3.    Organise a 1 day conference in late 2009 to help co-ordinate strategy.

4.    Liaise with other unions to map out the skills and jobs needed in a ‘green new deal’ prior to the Copenhagen summit

44      Barnsley College            Anniversary of Miners’ Strike.

This Congress notes that it is the anniversary of the 1984-5 miners’ strike.

The heroic year long strike was an outstanding example of class resistance to a government led attack on the mining community and the trade union movement as a whole.

This Congress believes that:

·          Deep mined coal is an essential part of a future non-nuclear energy policy.

·          It will require substantial investment in clean coal technology to make coal a viable part of an integrated energy policy.

·          Energy policy should be based on “people before profits”.

This Congress supports the case for deep mined coal as part of a future non-nuclear integrated energy policy in line with the clean coal technology recommendations of the National Union of Mineworkers.

 

Pensions (paragraphs 7 and 8)

45     Composite (Chesterfield College; City and Islington College Camden Road) Defending Pensions

Congress notes:

1) The threats made to Public Sector Pensions by sections of the media, politicians and the "pensions industry".

2) The attempt by the media to divide public and private sector workers over pensions.

3) The pressure on final salary and defined contribution pensions as a result of the economic crisis.

4) The recent attacks made on Irish public sector pensions by the 'pension levy' and the vigorous campaign to defence pensions mounted by Irish workers.

Congress believes that pensions represent deferred earnings, that any attempt to restrict pensions rights are a direct attack on workers' wellbeing and that final salary pensions for public sector workers must be defended against all attacks.

At a time when taxpayers have been given no choice about their own money being pumped into bailouts for banks and financial services to rescue the “top end of town” it would add further insult to injury for public sector workers, who serve the public good for much less financial reward, to have their pension rights attacked.

Congress resolves to instruct the NEC to:

·        Publicly oppose any suggestion that public sector final salary pension schemes be either closed, have their benefits reduced or employee contributions increased.

·        Convene or join a campaign with other public sector unions and the TUC to defend, from any attacks, public sector final salary pension schemes.

·        Coordinate with other trade unions to launch a powerful united campaign to defend all workers’ pension rights across the public & private sectors

46      Eastern and Homes Counties retired members     State pension

Despite the strong campaign on the centenary of the state pension, the government has failed to raise the state pension even to the poverty level.  The fact that the current Select Committee Enquiry is looking into tackling pensioner poverty indicates that the government is aware of its failure in this respect.

Congress instructs UCU to redouble its efforts in campaigning, together with other trade unions, for an increase of the basic state pension to at least the official poverty level.

46A.1 Northern Region Retired Members 

2nd paragraph, after ‘together with other trade unions’ add ‘and the National Pensioners Convention’ before the comma. At the end of the sentence before the full stop add ’, increased annually in line with the highest of prices or earnings index"

Support (paragraph 14)

47      University of Essex  Vice-Chancellor/Principal and senior pay restraint

Congress notes the growing public anger over executive pay in both the private and public sectors, and also notes the restraint being applied in the USA and the UK by government. Congress believes it is now time for the HE and FE sectors in the UK to follow suit.

Congress calls on HE and FE institutions to restrain the pay increases made in 2009-2012 to Vice Chancellors, Principals and other senior staff in HE and FE institutions such that they will not be permitted to take pay rises greater in percentage terms than the lowest increases paid to staff on negotiated pay scales.

47A.1 South East Regional Committee

Insert new paragraph at end: ‘Congress is also concerned that the number of senior academic staff in FE and HE institutions is increasing with proportionately less front line teaching staff and instructs UCU Officers to carry out an analysis of this and report to the NEC so that a campaign can be developed’.

47A.2 University of Portsmouth

The second paragraph to start with a new sentence "Congress calls on HE and FE institutions to adopt good governance principles and transparency and to publish details of senior staff remuneration when they are agreed." The first word of the current second paragraph 'Congress' to be replaced by 'It also'.

 

SECTION 5:  RULE CHANGES

48      National Executive Committee           Rule 2.9: Correction

Rule 2.9, after ‘which in the opinion of the National Executive’, add ‘Committee or Congress’

Purpose: to correct phrasing to make consistent with 2.8 and the first part of 2.9.

49      National Executive Committee          Legal assistance – rule 4.5

Rule 4.5, Delete first sentence. Replace with: ‘Members qualifying for membership under rule 3.1 and paying the relevant subscription (if any is due) under rule 7 to the University and College Union, shall be eligible to request legal advice and assistance in accordance with the Legal Advice and Assistance Scheme.’

Purpose: to simplify the references to subscription payments and honorary or other types of membership in rule 4.5, allowing the details to be covered in the Legal Advice and Assistance Scheme regulations approved by the NEC. The regulations define the scope of the scheme as matters arising out of or in connection with members’ employment or trade union duties or activities or as determined by the NEC.

 

50      Anti-Casualisation Committee           Rule change

Add new rule 12.5.1

12.5.1 The National Executive Committee may establish a branch/local association at its own volition or in response to a written request to the General Secretary by not less than 20 members working through an agency contract. Members in such a branch may designate the agency workers branch as their designated branch or may choose a branch of one of the institutions in which they work as their designated branch.

51      Anti-Casualisation Committee           Rule change

Add new rule 12.2.1

12.2.1 Members belonging to an agency workers branch set up under rule 12.5.1 may belong to and attend meetings of more than one branch/local association and vote on matters concerned with their employment but shall be entitled to stand for office and vote in national elections only in their designated branch/local association/central group.

52     South East Regional Committee        Rule Change- 12.5 – Branch/Local Association Rules

In Rule 12.5 at the end add: ‘Such Rules shall include a section on Facilities time for Officers of the Branch/Local Association as well as other Officers of UCU (including Regional and National Officers) who may from time to time be elected’.

Purpose: to ensure that all lay officers have adequate facilities time to carry out their functions.

53      West Midlands Regional Committee                     Rule 17.1

Delete "or in the case of institutions/ central groups/ regional retired members’ branches with fewer than 100 members, by aggregation of members in institutions/ central groups/ regional retired members` branches"
Rule 17.2

Delete "or in an aggregation of members in institutions/central groups/ regional retired members` branches in accordance with rule 17.1".

Purpose: To allow for a far greater democratic representation of members to Congress and other national gatherings.

54     South East Regional Committee   Rule Change – 17.1 – Congress Membership Aggregation

In Rule 17.1, line 3 delete "100", insert "75".

Purpose: to prevent small specialist Branches/Local Associations from being disenfranchised.

55      Academic-Related Staff Committee             Rule change

Add “and 2 members of each of the specialist committees set up under rule 24” after “members of the National Executive Committee” in rule 17.1 so that it reads:

17.1 National Congress shall consist of the members of the National Executive Committee and 2 members of each of the specialist committees set up under rule 24 together with members elected from sector committees in English regions, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, institutions and central groups and regional retired members’ branches, or in the case of institutions/central groups/regional retired members’ branches with fewer than 100 members, by aggregations of members in institutions/central groups/regional retired members’ branches, as specified by Congress Standing Orders. For the purpose of this Rule, the membership census date shall be 1 December in the year before the Congress.

56      West Midlands Regional Committee                     Rule changes (18.9)

Rule 18.9, insert new 18.9.3:

Where vacancies and/or casual vacancies result in there being no geographically-elected member of the National Executive Committee for a particular Sector within a particular geographical constituency, the National Executive Committee shall invite the regional committee(s) within the relevant geographical constituency to send an observer with speaking rights from the relevant sector to any meetings of a national sector committee.

Purpose: To ensure that any regional committee is democratically represented on the national sector committee when there is no geographically elected member from that region.

57      National Executive Committee           NEC election rules and UCU Wales

Rule 19.4, delete ‘Wales’.

Insert new rule 19.5: ‘The regionally-elected seats for Wales will be elected in accordance with Rule 34.3.’

Insert new rule 18.7.1.1: ‘One of the regionally-elected NEC members for Wales whose term starts at the end of the annual meeting of National Congress in 2010 will, if so required by the rules of UCU Wales, serve a one-year term. This rule 18.7.1.1 will be deleted following the close of Congress 2010.’

Insert new 18.9.2.1: ‘Regionally-elected NEC members for Wales, whose terms of office start at the end of the annual meeting of National Congress in 2010 only, will, if so required by the rules of UCU Wales, be elected by and from all members whose institutions are based in Wales. This rule 18.9.2.1 will be deleted following the close of Congress 2010.’

Purpose: to allow UCU Wales to establish the election of a Vice President and President of UCU Wales who will be the regionally-elected NEC members for Wales (After 2010, one NEC member for Wales would be elected each year, as Vice President of UCU Wales, progressing to President of UCU Wales in the second year of that term, alternating between election from the FE and HE sectors.)

58      National Executive Committee           Rule 19.5: consequential amendment

Rule 19.5: delete ‘one representative’ (of disabled members), replace with ‘two representatives’. Delete ‘one representative’ (of lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender representatives), replace with ‘two representatives’.

Purpose: to update this rule following last year’s changes to NEC election rules.

59      National Executive Committee           Operation of Trustees

Rule 25.3, beginning of sentence, delete ‘four’, replace with ‘five’

Purpose: to increase the number of Trustees from four to five.

After rule 25.4, add:

25.4.1 In this Rule “meeting” means any occasion during which the Trustees simultaneously participate in order to exercise their duties, powers and authorities, whether the Trustees are physically present together, participating in a video or telephone call or otherwise.   Reference to a person being present or attending a meeting is construed accordingly.  

25.4.2 The Trustees’ duties, powers and authorities are exercisable at meetings to be held as often as may be appropriate.   Alternatively, decisions may be reached by circular resolution (which may consist of more than one document) signed by all of the Trustees without the need for a meeting.

25.4.3 At their first meeting after Congress the Trustees shall elect a Chair of Trustees who will hold the position of Chair for one year.  In the event that the Trustees are unable to elect a Chair the President will decide who will be the Chair.

25.4.4 A meeting of the Trustees must be called if requested by the Chair or by any other two of the Trustees. 

25.4.5 Any of the duties, powers and authorities given to or vested in the Trustees (whether in these Rules or by Statute) may at any time be exercised by a majority of the Trustees. All acts and proceedings of the majority of the Trustees shall, in such circumstances, be as valid and effectual as if all the Trustees had concurred.

25.4.6 Any Trustee who dissents from any decision of the majority shall nevertheless concur in executing or signing any documents or doing any act necessary for giving effect to any such decision by the majority of the Trustees without being responsible for loss or for any breach of duty towards any beneficiary.

25.4.7   Any Trustee who, by reasons of illness, infirmity or temporary absence abroad, may be unable, or unable without substantial inconvenience, to participate in a meeting of the Trustees may, in order to facilitate business, by power of attorney or otherwise in writing appoint another Trustee as his/her proxy to participate and vote on his/her behalf and to use his or her name for execution or signature of documents.

25.4.8 Any consent, authority or decision of the Trustees may be evidenced in writing, signed by the Chair of the Trustees for the time being or by any two of the Trustees.   

25.4.9 Each Trustee for whom it is reasonably practicable must be given notice of any meeting when a decision will be taken no later than 7 working days before that meeting.   The requirement to give this notice does not apply if:

a. A meeting is necessary as a matter of urgency to make a decision or

b. All the Trustees have agreed (at a meeting or by circular resolution in accordance with the sub-rule above) that notice is not required to hold the meeting in question or

c. All the Trustees attend the meeting in question and agree at that meeting that notice is not required to hold the meeting.

Any notice must state the date, time and place of the meeting and must be sent to each Trustee’s last known address.  

25.4.10 The Trustees must keep records of their meetings in writing and those records must include the following information:

a. The date, time and place of meeting.

b. The names of the Trustees invited to the meeting.

c. The names of the Trustees who attended the meeting and those who did not attend.

d. The names of any professional advisors or other attendees of the meeting.

e. Any decisions made at the meeting.

f. Details of any decisions made by the Trustees since the last meeting. 

Purpose: to increase the number of trustees from four to five and clarify the ways in which the Trustees may make decisions.

60      National Executive Committee           Fighting Fund

Add new rule 30.5:

There shall be a permanent fighting fund established into which shall be paid at least 1% of each subscription received in each year from members together with monies paid by voluntary donation to the union to finance any strike, lock-out or any other industrial dispute. This fund shall not be used for any other purpose except by i) decision of National Congress; or  ii) an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members of the National Executive Committee. The National Executive Committee will determine the process by which payments from this fund are made to members, and will report each year to Congress on expenditure from the fund.

Purpose: to make the fighting fund (which already exists) a requirement under the union’s rules.

Congress Standing Orders

61      Anti-Casualisation Committee           Rule Change

In paragraph 36 of the Congress Standing Orders insert: “members of committees listed in rules 16.6.4 attending under arrangements agreed by the NEC” after “Trustees” such that the paragraph reads:

          36.      Only members of a Conference, members of Congress Business Committee, Trustees, members of committees listed in rules 16.6.4 attending under arrangements agreed by the NEC and Union employees may be admitted to a Private Session.

62     National Executive Committee          

         Congress standing order 43: call for special Congress/conference

Congress Standing Order 43, second sentence, delete ‘in the form of’, replace with ‘which may include’

Purpose: to remove the implication that only the motions issued in the calling notice of a special meeting of Congress or Sector Conference can be transacted at the meeting, noting that standing order 44 goes on to say that such a notice must include a timetable for submitting motions and amendments. The amendment deliberately does not prevent motions being included in the call, however.

63      National Executive Committee          

          Congress standing order 47 - aggregation

Delete Congress Standing Order 47

(Standing order 47: ‘The Congress Business Committee shall make arrangements to revise the pattern of aggregation of branch/local associations between Congresses, in consultation with branches/local associations.’)

Purpose: This removes responsibility for changes in the aggregation of branches from CBC, which CBC does not feel it can meaningfully undertake. The NEC’s Recruitment, Organising and Campaigning Committee has currently agreed to take oversight of this as necessary.

64      National Executive Committee          

          Standing order 48: CBC sectoral quorum

5.1.2  Congress Standing Order 48, add at end ‘For a meeting of a sectoral sub-group of CBC, in respect of annual or special sector conference meetings, the quorum shall be two.

Purpose: To specify a quorum for sectoral meetings of CBC. (There is currently no quorum given.)         

 

SECTION 6:  BUSINESS OF THE RECRUITMENT, ORGANISING AND CAMPAIGNING COMMITTEE

National organising plan (paragraphs 1 and 2)

65      National Executive Committee

          National Organising Plan Priorities 2009-10

Congress recognises the substantial progress made in implementing the National Organising Plan ('NOP') and reiterates that UCU’s key task is to defend and improve pay and conditions, and to promote UCU's vision of education as a critical democratic resource.

Under the NOP, UCU’s regional structure has been reconfigured to include organising plans; increased resources have been made available to reps; effective campaigns fought against dereognition, privatisation and job cuts; and projects aimed at improving organisation initiated.

Congress notes that further progress will be dependent on focusing regional and national committees on campaigning and organising, and engaging branches in the work of the NOP.  The NEC is asked to issue further guidance to branches and regions on their role in implementing the NOP.

Congress notes and endorses the revised NOP priorities for 2009/10 and instructs the NEC to review progress against the Plan's recommendations, reporting back to Congress.

65A.1 University of Dundee

Add

Recruitment is crucial to the success of the NOP.   Specifically there is urgent need to recruit young lecturers/academic related staff into the UCU

That many unions, such as the NUT, have successful young members’ structures (35 and under.)

To develop a young members’ network in the UCU. To call a national young members conference.  To set up and elect a national young members advisory committee with two delegates from every UCU region.

66      UCU Scotland        National Organising Plan

This Congress welcomes the initiative taken by UCU Congress in approving a National Organising Plan and recognising that each region and devolved nation should customise this into an appropriate plan suited to the requirements of the branches and, where applicable, the need to engage with devolved governments, funding bodies and other organisations as well as undertaking generic organisational development to strengthen the union itself.

Congress calls on the NEC to agree to roll the 2008/9 National Organising Plan forward for 2009/10, as the objectives are both ambitious and enduring.  The year 2009/10 should be used for wider consultation with a view to developing a more focused National Organising Plan for May 2010 onwards and to ensure that national Congresses including UCU Scotland Congress and regional committees can inform the development of the detailed plan prior to ROCC and National Executive Committee drafting the plan for approval by UCU Congress.

67     Composite (University of Brighton, Moulsecoomb; South East Regional Committee)   The NOP and Bargaining Strategies

Congress notes the:

·         success of the NOP in beginning the enhancement of departmental and institutional representation, unfolding universal training programmes, and coordinating recruitment activity;

·         Branch Development Organiser appointments soon to cover all Regions, and the national coordination of NOP-related work of regional offices;

·         on-going refinement of regional maps of local agreements in FE and HE sectors, and the mapping of membership densities within and between institutions.

Congress resolves that, using the NOP, the NEC and sub-committees initiate a ‘levelling-up’ campaign involving the:

·         identification of the  best pay and conditions regionally, and regional patterns of divergence from national agreements or sectoral trends;

·         forging of FE and HE Regional Committees into cohesive and informed bodies that devise regional industrial strategies in conjunction with the regional office staff;

·         organisation and mobilisation of Branches in Regional campaigns of negotiations and industrial action to level up pay and conditions to the best available.

67A.1 Anti-Casualisation Committee

Add 4th bullet point at end: ‘highlighting of the interests of casualised members’

68      Women’s Standing Committee          National organising plan

Congress welcomes the move to draw up a National Organising Plan (NOP) that will place a clear focus on the organising agenda. Congress sees the place of women in the union to be central to the organising agenda and calls on the NEC to support the efforts of the Women’s Committee to:

·          Take an active role in providing advice that will contribute to the NOP

·          Identify its own work within the NOP

·          Monitor the implementation of the NOP in relation to its impact on women members

·          Ensure that the NOP is reviewed and updates to ensure it maintains the concerns of women as a central aim

69      Aston University            Training programme for union representatives  

Congress recognises the importance of training of union representatives in the National Organising Plan. However, the current training programme is inflexible in the way it delivers the training and is thus a barrier to participation, particularly for those with caring responsibilities or on fixed working hours. This Congress therefore instructs NEC to develop a training programme which is more flexible in its delivery including considering distance learning elements.

70      National Executive Committee           Campaigning on workload protection

Congress urges ROCC to make workload protection a campaigning priority for the whole union and recommends to ROCC the HESC working group paper as a basis for the campaign. Both HE and FE members are subject to increasing workloads and the reduction and control of workload is an issue for the entire union.

 

 

National organising plan (paragraph 3)

71      Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee          

Strikes over contracting out

Congress notes:
1. The current international jobs slaughter;
2. Mass resistance to job losses in France, Greece, Spain, Ireland;
3. Government bailouts for bankers, but their refusal to protect jobs;
4. Strike action against contractors exploiting European legislation to undermine pay and conditions, fuelled by the bosses; neo-liberal economic agenda;
5. The slogan ‘British jobs for British workers’, welcomed by the right-wing press and the BNP, and the dangerous sentiments underlying it.

Congress:
a. Reiterates support for equal pay, binding national agreements negotiated by TUs, equal legal status for all regardless of nationality, all workers’ rights to work abroad.
b. Condemns ‘contracting out’ and privatisation which uses competition to drive down workers’ pay and conditions.
c. Applauds action to defend jobs but believes the above slogan can only divide working class communities and advantage the bosses, the BNP fascists and all those hostile to the trade union movement.

72     Queen’s University Belfast       Organisation of Staff in Private Education Suppliers

UCU reaffirms its opposition to all forms of privatization, including outsourcing, of Further and Higher Education in the UK. However where privatisation does occur, UCU recognises a need to provide protection for staff in privatised initiatives. Congress thus instructs the NEC to:

1) Continue campaigns opposing privatization, highlighting both the employment rights of staff in private education suppliers and their potential to undermine the work and conditions of service of staff in public further and higher education;

2) Initiate vigorous organizing campaigns in all privatized suppliers of further and higher education to ensure that staff in these ventures benefit from trade union recognition and representation;

3) Focus said campaign around the inferior work relations, and terms and conditions in these enterprises.

73      Oxford and Cherwell Valley College        Outsourcing

Congress is concerned about the growing use of outsourcing in further and higher education. While initially such outsourcing was in areas such as cleaning and catering, it is now spreading to other functions including teaching and the provision of key services including the reporting of sickness absences. In essence, outsourcing is a form of privatisation and is only taken on by private sector companies to make a profit. UCU is opposed to the general principle of such outsourcing and calls upon the union at all levels to continue to oppose further moves in this direction. Further and higher education institutions should aim to provide all services directly and employ the staff on standard and negotiated terms and conditions of employment.

73A.1 London Regional Committee

Add as final paragraph:

Congress is concerned that outsourcing of IT systems and services in post-16 institutions may be the first step to "taking out" an institution. Congress instructs NEC to commission an audit of all outsourcing in post 16 education to report by next congress.

74      University College London  Email Outsourcing – the high cost of low price

Congress believes:

·          That all forms of marketisation are an attack on our employment conditions.

·          That marketisation takes two typical forms: outsourcing services previously provided by employed staff and hiring staff via external agencies.

Congress notes:

·          Proposals to outsource Information Technology (IT) services to private sector providers are often formulated without consulting staff and students.

·          Technical arguments are often disingenuous and little regard is given to improving in-house provision.

·          External providers such as Microsoft are presenting schemes that will be initially 'free' but do not take into account high transition costs and ultimately higher fees for service provision.

·          Questions regarding privacy, security, training and accountability go unanswered.

Congress resolves:

·          To campaign for sufficient staff, training and infrastructure investment to maintain and improve in-house IT services.

·          To involve other campus Trade Unions and Student Unions in a joint campaign to defend in-house IT.

75      National Executive Committee          

University of Liverpool - departmental closures

Congress congratulates Liverpool University UCU for organising protests against widespread departmental closures.

Congress believes that these proposed closures are an unacceptable response to the outcome of the recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).

There is a danger that the employer response at Liverpool will generalise, creating a threat throughout the HE sector.

UCU members’ jobs continue to be lost and provision cut across post-16 education despite government and employer rhetoric on the importance of the FE sector during recession.

Congress resolves to campaign for a large scale investment in education, favouring the expansion of jobs and opposition to the draconian closure of subject areas and whole departments.

ROCC, working with FEC and HEC under the NOP, is instructed to initiate a national campaign to:

• protect jobs

• defend provision

• provide targeted support to branches fighting cuts

• make common cause with other unions in campaigning against mass unemployment

76     Composite (Coleg Morgannwg, Deeside College) Compulsory Redundancies in Wales

Congress congratulates members of UCU Wales on their successful campaign to restore the 7.4% FE funding cuts.

It welcomes the Welsh Assembly Government decision to increase this years budget by £9m, aimed at negating any need for redundancies.

However Congress utterly condemns fforwm and those Welsh colleges who have made it clear that they will still press ahead with redundancies despite the Assembly's decision.

Furthermore Congress fully endorses UCU Cymru's decision to urge all Welsh branches facing the threat of compulsory redundancies immediately to ballot for industrial action, up to and including strike action.

Congress also endorses Wales FESC decision to organise national lobbies outside affected colleges to support striking colleagues.

76A.1          Compositing amendment (Deeside College)

Add at end of 4rth paragraph: “, and agrees to pay sustentation at £50 per day”.

77     Composite (East Midlands Regional Committee, Manchester Metropolitan University)  Jobs for all

Congress notes:
1) We celebrate diversity in our colleges, our schools, and our communities
2) Teachers, private and public sector workers, unemployed and students are stronger when they are united
3) Workers are right to fights cuts
4) ‘British Jobs for British Workers’ is a nationalist slogan that divides workers and fuels racism. This deflects the real anger over unemployment and cuts away from the bosses, politicians and bankers
5) Billions of pounds of taxpayers money has disappeared to bail out the bankers. This money is for education and public services
6) Estimates suggest the crisis will leave 3 million unemployed
7) The gutter press attempts to divide employed workers against unemployed workers, private sector against public sector workers, and ‘British Worker’ against ‘Foreign Worker’

Congress believes that an injury to one is an injury to all, and in jobs and education for all. We will not let race, nationality or status divide us.

Congress therefore resolves to:

a) Raise the slogans ‘an injury to one is an injury to all’, ‘jobs for all’ and ‘education for all’
b) Resist division based on race, nationality or status.

78               Bradford College  Resistance in the recession

Congress congratulates the workers of Prisme and Visteon on their successful campaigns against summary dismissal with no compensation, and UCU members at Doncaster College on their inspiring victory against a large scale threat of redundancies and dilution.

Congress also congratulates Wales UCU on the successful outcome to their campaign to force more funding from the Welsh Assembly.

In each case workers have refused to accept that job losses, cuts and closures in this recession are inevitable. They have refused to accept the view that workers must inevitably pay for the crisis.

These successful disputes, which have attracted widespread solidarity and support, have shown that through militant resistance, including strike action, occupations, rallies, mass lobbies and demonstrations, workers and their unions can mobilise popular and successful fightbacks.

Congress resolves to widely publicise these victories as examples of the sort of militant fightback required to defend our own members’ jobs and conditions.

79      London Regional Committee  Defending Jobs and Education

Congress:

·          Notes that UCU members’ jobs continue to be lost and provision cut across post-16 education despite government and employer rhetoric on the importance of our sector during a recession

·          Believes that making educators redundant is an act of vandalism when rising unemployment and social and economic inequity mean education has never been so important

·          Instructs ROCC, working with the FE and HE committees under the National Organising Plan to initiate a national campaign to protect jobs, defend provision; provide targeted support to branches fighting cuts; and make common cause with other unions in campaigning against mass unemployment

 

79A.1 Anti-Casualisation Committee

Add fourth bullet point at end: ‘Recognizes that cuts may disproportionately affect fixed-term and hourly paid staff and resolves to oppose these redundancies with equal vigour as those of staff on full-time and permanent contracts’.

79A.2 London Regional Committee

Add as final bullet point:
Congress agrees to support the Conference ‘Fight for the Right to Work’ supported by Visteon workers and the Waterford Crystal shop stewards on 13th June in London

80      Northern Regional Committee          People’s Charter for Change

Congress welcomes the launch of the Peoples' Charter by a broad coalition of trade unions and progressive organisations and supports its policies for:

·          a fair economy for a fairer Britain

·          more and better jobs

·          decent homes for all

·          protecting and improving public services

·          social justice

·          a secure and sustainable future

We believe that a mass popular campaign for the People's Charter can help to bring about a change of direction in government policy, away from the interests of big business and towards the interests of working people.

We therefore urge UCU organisations and members to collect signatures for the People's Charter petition and help organise activities to promote it. We also instruct the National Executive Committee to affiliate to the campaign and provide assistance as appropriate.

Anti-casualisation (paragraph 4)

81     Composite (Anti-Casualisation Committee; University of Dundee) 

         Collective grievances and campaigning for fractionalisation

Congress notes:

·         The marketisation of education continues to drive casualisation.

·         Hourly paid lecturers may not be provided with written terms and conditions, often fail to have their rate increased with annual uplifts and miss out on incremental progression

·         Through effective local organisation and employment law, collective claims present the best opportunity of winning fractionalisation for a significant number of casualised staff.

Congress believes:

·         The fight against casualisation cannot wait on the employers’ goodwill.

·         Collective grievance procedures can help win fractionalisation and provide an effective recruiting tool among casualised staff.

Congress calls for:

·            branches to campaign in support of hourly paid lecturers and for their move to fractionalised contracts

·          A guide to organising and pursuing collective grievances for fractionalisation of casualised staff and parity of conditions

·          A series of national and regional briefings for branch officers and representatives to promote collective grievance organisation.

82      Anti-Casualisation Committee           Agency Workers

Congress deplores the exploitation of agency workers in education. It calls on the NEC to work vigorously for:

1    the implementation of the European Agency Workers’ Directive into UK law, in a way that fully covers agency workers in FE and HE, specifically challenging the 12 week rule;

2    acceptance in our sectors that agency workers (including, for example, researchers in HE and lecturers in FE) receive the same terms and conditions, including pay, as directly employed staff, bringing them in line with local and national bargaining agreements;

3    UCU branches to represent, and be recognised as representing, agency workers in their institution who are members, by specifically challenging the false notion of self employment;

4    equal access for agency workers to occupational pension schemes;

5    an accumulation of data on the growth of employment agencies in our sector, with which to inform our future policies.

Work with other committees (paragraph 8)

83     Academic-Related Staff Committee             Academic-Related Manifesto

This Congress welcomes the production of the AR manifesto and commends its use to all UCU regional committees, local associations and branches.

The manifesto highlights the importance of administrators, librarians, IT professionals and other related categories within UCU.

This Congress asks that all regional committees, local associations and branches be provided with copies of the AR manifesto and encouraged to consider how best the manifesto could be utilised in the context of the National Organising Plan.

 

 

 

 

FURTHER EDUCATION SECTOR CONFERENCE: MOTIONS FOR DEBATE

 

FE1    Further Education Committee Election of National Negotiators for FE in England

Conference agrees to adopt the formula outlined in circular UCU/179 for the election of negotiators to the FE National Joint Forum for England.

FE2    Composite (City and Islington College Camden Road, Barnsley College, Further Education Committee)

Stopping the Break Up of Further/Adult Education

Conference notes:

1)  The Leitch Review and Train to Gain.

2)  A recent survey shows that 50% of large companies training budgets will be cut.

3)  The government’s 14- 19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals.

Conference believes:

1)  The government’s strategy based on the Leitch review, no longer fits in a period of rising unemployment.

2)  The 14 – 19 strategy will continue to roll out the market into education and, along with raising the school leaving age, will not meet the needs of young people.

Conference resolves:

1)  To oppose the 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals.

2)  To campaign for Further and Adult Education to be fully brought back under Local Authority control, including governance with regional overarching structures. 

3)  To campaign for real planning of Further and Adult Education, a broad curriculum and training based upon general, vocational and transferable skills, and not just  “skills” .

4)  To campaign for statutory rights to paid educational leave and to workplace training committees.

FE2A.1  Further Education Committee

Delete “  1)  To oppose the 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals.”

Insert  “We have serious reservations about the 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals, continue to oppose a compulsory raising of the school leaving age and a market driven system” before “Conference resolves”

 

 

FE3    North West Region FE Committee    

The ‘market’ in time of recession – challenging the Leitch report

Conference notes that the Leitch review was produced during a period of economic optimism, resulting in the production of narrow employer-led training and limited opportunities for working people to access good quality education and training programmes.  The recession has forced the Government to re-examine the Leitch review – its narrow demand-led approach being revealed as insufficient even in the Government’s own terms.

Conference calls on the FEC to campaign for:

1.    A full review of Leitch and a re-examination of the implementation plan; 

2.    A broadening out of the skills agenda that will have at its core an entitlement for adults to access properly funded education and training at all levels.

FE4    London Region FE Committee           FE Funding

Conference is concerned about the impending fragmentation of funding for FE with local authorities, a new skills agency and other funding streams pursuing separate priorities.

In London, where there is a large amount of cross borough student movement, there is a real danger of local authorities pursuing their own particular interests to the detriment of students and colleges.

We call for the creation of democratically accountable bodies to plan for the overall provision of education in metropolitan areas in the interests of students and financially stable colleges. Conference instructs the General Secretary to make formal proposals and instigate talks with the Department for Skills in order to achieve this.

FE5    College of North East London                     The Campaigning Alliance for Lifelong Learning

Conference congratulates CALL for its parliamentary lobby and recognises UCU's pivotal role.  CALL exposes the contradictions in government policy concerning community cohesion and access to higher education

Conference notes

·         The number of economically inactive people of working age in the UK reached 7.86m in December 2008. Unemployment is at 6.3%, and redundancies at their highest point since records began.

·         1.4 million places in adult and community education have been lost over 2 years

·         As the UK enters a depression educational opportunities are more necessary than ever

·         163 MPs have signed Early Day Motion 533

Conference resolves to campaign with CALL for

·         Free entry-level ESOL and basic skills courses

·         Free access courses to higher education

·         Reversal of government policy that removed funding for ELQ

·         Train to Gain budget under-spend allocated to meet adult learner demand

·         Reversal of Adult and PCDL budget cuts

FE6    Composite (Yorkshire and Humberside region FE committee; Oxford and Cherwell Valley College) College Building Programme

FE Sector Conference deplores the fact that many FE colleges have been put into financial difficulties because of the government’s encouragement of new build.

We note that where new build has taken place, despite new technology and some showpiece features, the pressure to maintain financial security has resulted in a worsening of pay and conditions for staff and damage to the quality of education.

While we welcome investment in FE colleges to offset the poor physical state of the buildings in the sector due to lack of investment in the past, we note the decision of the LSC to delay making decisions on funding new build which is causing uncertainty in the sector and possible financial penalties on colleges as building costs escalate and the value of land declines.

FE should be prioritised for investment during the recession so that we have a generation prepared to face the new challenges of the future.

However we note:

·         the loss of space in many of the new builds and fears for the quality of building programmes

·         the risk that the new buildings are focused on the marketing aspect of attracting new students rather than the quality of the teaching and learning environment

·         the risk that refurbishment of existing buildings could be neglected

·         the risk that PFI type schemes will increasingly be used as a substitute to direct public sector funding

Conference therefore demands that:

·         the government puts financial support in place to maintain the quality of FE for       both staff and students

·         FE building programmes, where needed, should be fully planned and funded.

FE6A.1        South East Regional FE Committee

Add new bullet point at the end: ‘the FEC develops a campaign that identifies and highlights the Health, Safety and Welfare problems facing staff and students in new buildings.’

FE7    London Region FE Committee

FE Conference notes the Budget allocated some additional FE funding but has grave concerns that:

·         Colleges which have invested in new builds may not receive this extra funding;

·         Additional resources to guarantee either a job or training to those under 25 and unemployed for 12 months will be linked to sustainable employment which colleges cannot deliver;

·         ‘efficiency' savings being demanded by Government will mean £400 million cuts by DIUS;

·         While government bails out bankers, it aims to make workers pay through job losses and pay cuts. Labour remains wedded to neo-liberalism and marketisation in FE. Jobs, conditions and pensions would be severely hit.

Conference resolves to:

·         step up campaigning for more F/AE funding and against marketisation.

·         organise regional forums to map out strategies to secure our aims.

·         resist FE cuts and job losses through action up to and including national strike action.

FE8    Further Education Committee          

Further and Adult Education pay in a time of recession

Conference notes:

·         The unprecedented sums of public money given to bail out bankers, while public sector workers’ pay remains under tight control.

·         FE lecturers remain among the lowest paid teachers across all sectors.

Conference believes:

·         That investment in FE is vital to rebuilding our economy and society during a recession.

·         FE lecturers should not pay the price for the crisis of the system. “Bail out the workers not the bankers.”

Conference resolves:

·         To campaign for a national pay deal that closes the pay gap between FE lecturers and our colleagues in schools and HE.

·         To instruct the FEC, in the event of a breakdown of negotiations, to organise effective industrial action, seeking to unite with other unions in our sector and other public sector workers.

·         To congratulate members involved in the “IOU” campaign and continue this fight for full implementation of national pay agreements in all FE colleges.

 

 

 

 

FE8A.1        Women Members’ Standing Committee

          Insert after bullet point 6, new bullet point:

to further instruct the FEC to ensure that including equal pay audits and the implementation of the gender equality duties are necessary to ensure that in any negotiations women's rights are retained as a bargaining policy.

FE8A.2        Sheffield College (Norton)

add at end:

• That the pay year should be changed to run from 1st February to 31st January
• To instruct the FE negotiators to pursue an interim 18 month Pay Award as soon as is practicable so that the pay year can be changed without members losing ‘back pay’

FE9    Barnet College (Barnet & Hendon)  National pay and conditions in FE

Conference notes the absurdity of 300 Colleges in England conducting separate local negations on conditions. Similarly, Conference notes the absurdity of national FE pay deals that are not always honoured locally.

Countless thousands of working hours could be saved and damaging disputes avoided by adopting locally-binding national negotiations, as is standard in much of the public sector. Meanwhile the resources saved could be diverted to improving both working conditions and educational quality.

Conference instructs the General Secretary to make formal proposals and to instigate talks urgently with the Minister for Skills and the Association of Colleges in order to achieve this.

FE10  Liverpool Community College                     Pay Banding

Sector Conference notes the increasing tendency for colleges to avoid the full adoption of nationally agreed pay structures by resorting to the use of banding which caps the potential salaries of staff.  This is often justified by the argument that teachers should not be able to progress to the top of the salary scale without taking on additional responsibilities, which overlooks the fact that these are nationally agreed TEACHING scales.

This is an increasing and worrying development, which potentially threatens to undermine national pay and conditions structures.

We further note the rejection of banding schemes within UCU national proposals for this year’s pay negotiations.  We call on UCU nationally to see banding schemes as of equal importance to the targeting of colleges that have not yet adopted the 8 point pay scale, and to co ordinate and lead a national campaign against such developments.

FE11  South East Region FE Committee  FE Pay and Conditions of Service

Sector Conference instructs the FEC to agree strategies that:

·         restore national conditions of service with levels at least as good as those that were in the 'Silver Book';

·         restore pay levels to at least parity with school teachers;

·         include pay increases for “Silver Book” staff in all future pay claims;

·         achieve parity of funding for courses between FE and Schools;

·         end the present Byzantine “claw back” by funding bodies;

FE11A.1      Anti-Casualisation Committee

Add bullet point at end: “Discourage the use of agencies and encourage direct employment instead”.

FE12  London Region FE Committee           London Weighting

Conference fully supports its London members in their campaign for a realistic London Weighting which fully reflects the extra cost of living in London and calls on the NEC to do all in its power to ensure the success of this campaign. Conference instructs full-time and lay FE National Negotiators to make a claim for improved London Weighting every year until this is achieved. 

FE13  Shrewsbury College of Arts & Technology  Publication of FE pay scales and significant terms and conditions

This Conference seeks that UCU publishes on an annual basis, the details of pay scales and significant terms and conditions (eg holiday entitlement & annual teaching hours) for all FE colleges, with a view to promoting a greater awareness between members in order that a more effective coordinated approach to any industrial action be achieved in the pursuit of proper and full implementation of all National Agreements on pay and/or terms & conditions.

FE13A.1      Further Education Committee

          add after annual teaching hours in first sentence (bracketed) – “and remission”

FE14  Lambeth College            Pay Disparity

In the light of pay disparity, this Conference agrees to call for a reduction in pay for all Principals, to not more than twice that of lecturers’ pay.

FE14A.1      Further Education Committee

          Add at end

Conference notes the LSC data for 2007/8 with disgust. The data reveals the annual orgy of pay hikes for English FE Principals. Meanwhile data for staff pay rises have been omitted to attempt to obscure embarrassing comparisons.
Conference instructs the General Secretary to write again to the FE Minister to

·  Draw attention to data

·  Demand that full data regarding College pay rises are published immediately

·  Demand a government enquiry into F.E. pay.”

FE15 Composite (Lambeth College, Richmond upon Thames College, Barnsley College, Chesterfield College)       Workloads

FE Sector Conference believes that workload, stress and bullying are major issue facing our members. The marketisation of education has encouraged a management ethos defined by hollow notions of “economies of scale” and “cost efficiency” and other jargon, used to erode the human element in teaching and working conditions for teaching and support staff.

We propose that UCU adopt a campaign on workload similar to that of the successful NUT campaign a few years ago

FE sector Conference notes:

1.  Workloads are out of control

2. A bureaucratic education structure and culture of testing and monitoring are harming our member's health and students learning.

3.  Public sector workers work on average 7 hours a week of unpaid overtime

4.  The narrow criteria of success in education limited to employability and skills neglecting community cohesion and the learning experience

5.  Teachers, parents, students and the community have little say in how our colleges are run and what they are for.

We agree that in future, with all work-related tasks, we should ask:

(a) Does it need to be done, and

(b) If so, does it need the skills of a trained teacher.

If A applies, but not B, the work should be covered by college support staff.

We further agree to:

1.  Initiate a strong national campaign of action over workload, with industrial action if necessary

2.  Call for this issue to be a regular feature in our magazine

3.  To roll out Manifesto meetings: 'Another education is possible?'

4.  Produce a toolkit for branch reps 'Fighting workloads; getting organised'

5.  Organise regional conferences where activists can share experiences, outline priorities and discuss plans of action.

6.  Campaign alongside Unison and NUS to demand that administrative, student welfare, and other support staff posts which have been lost to cuts, are reinstated.

7.  Call a national day of action: 'Workloads red alert - let us teach!

8.  To call a protest at the Learning Skills Council

9.  Publicise all victories and best practice

FE15A.1      Lambeth College

Add new point 10: campaign alongside the NUT

FE16  Westminster-Kingsway College         Lesson Observation Disputes

Sector Conference notes that lesson observations remain an issue in dispute in a number of colleges. We support the action taken at Westminster-Kingsway and any other college to resist the imposition of divisive and punitive schemes which are seriously exacerbating stress levels and workloads of lecturers and driving some out of the profession. We call on the NEC to give this issue a much higher priority than it has received and to circulate guidelines on best practice in the sector.

FE16A.1      North West Regional FE Sector Meeting

At the end of the first sentence:

 “in dispute in a number of colleges…..”

Insert:

“and of concern to all FE lecturers.  The introduction of repeated and/or unannounced ‘walk through’ observations constitutes yet another fundamental worsening of the conditions of our members. 

Along with other detrimental measures being pursued by college managements at the behest of the LSC, OFSTED and sundry government agencies, these observations introduce new opportunities for bullying, intimidation and victimization.  They thereby threaten both our members’ livelihoods and the quality of educational experience for our students.”

FE16A.2      London Region FE sector

Add at end:

Much of this problem arises from College Managements acting unilaterally to corrupt the rationale of teaching observations. Conference instructs the Head of Colleges and FEC to instigate negotiations with the AoC and Ofsted in order to establish a national collective agreement on observations which protects lecturers from:

·  excessive observations

·  persecution when achieving a 'satisfactory' grade

·  unilateral impositions of punitive observation schemes

FE17  South East Region FE Sector Committee     IFL

Sector Conference:

(a) recognises the importance of a professionally qualified workforce but is concerned that IFL, despite significant funding, is not widely accepted as a truly supportive, independent and representational body. Staff:

·         are unsure about what exactly IFL stands for;

·         have concerns IFL is becoming another tier of management and a government puppet;

·         see CPD requirements as another onerous set of hoops to jump through;

·         feel membership does not give staff the professional status they deserve;

·         are worried they may fall foul of IFL regulations, either wittingly or through allegations of misconduct, disenfranchising them from the teaching profession;

·         are suspicious colleges may use IFL membership in a negative way and have questioned the writing of IFL membership into contracts of employment.

·         want to restore parity with School teachers as part of their professionalism.

(b) instructs the FEC to review IFL operations to date and to report back in the autumn with recommendations.

FE17A.1      South East Regional FE Committee

Insert new paragraphs (b), (c) and (d) and renumber old (b) to become (e):

‘(b) congratulates the IFL on identifying some of the serious problems faced by FE teachers;
(c) feels disappointed in the IFL failure to propose any actions to deal with these problems;
(d) urges the IFL to set up a working party to develop a comprehensive strategy to combat those problems.’

FE18  Tower Hamlets College                     Way forward for fractionalisation

Conference notes:

·         The large number of FE colleges that employ a substantial proportion of their teachers on hourly paid fixed term contracts or use temporary agency workers.

·         That some branches are successfully challenging this.

Conference believes:

·         That hourly paid staff are discriminated against in relation to comparable lecturers  on permanent contracts in terms of pay and job security

·         That teaching staff should have the same pay and conditions

·         That a two tier workforce strengthens management by opening up the workforce to tactics promoting competition between members for teaching hours

Conference resolves:

·         To support branch campaigns for the fractionalisation of hourly paid staff

·         To provide campaign materials including successful cases of fractionalisation.

·         To facilitate the exchange of information between branches involved in these campaigns

·         To 'twin' branches to help achieve above resolve

FE18A.1      East Midlands Regional FE Committee

Conference notes:
Add:
The policy of some colleges to deliberately “under-fractionalise” lecturing staff, leading to further serious discrimination.

Insert in Conference Resolves bullet point 1. “full” between “the” and “fractionalisation”

FE19  Anti-Casualisation Committee           Agency Workers

This meeting deplores the exploitation of agency workers in the FE sector, including low pay and denial of access to an occupational pension, and calls on the FEC to work vigorously for:

1.  the full implementation of the European Agency Workers’ Directive into UK law in a way that fully covers agency workers in FE / adult and community education;

2.  agreements in our sector that agency workers receive the same terms and conditions as directly employed staff, including pay, from day one, which would bring agency workers’ terms and conditions under national and local bargaining agreements;

3.  the enforcement of any new legal requirements for agency workers to receive equal pay to colleagues;

4.  the recognition of UCU branches as representing agency workers in the institutions where they represent staff;

5.  access for agency workers to the Teachers’ Pension Scheme.

FE20          Anti-Casualisation Committee           Contracts for Services in the FE sector

FESC notes the important legal distinctions between 'employees' and 'workers' under EU and UK law, and that some employers in the FE sector use 'contracts for services' to define staff as workers rather than employees. This is used to maintain a casualised workforce and to justify unequal treatment, including denial of the rights to redundancy consultation and pay.

FESC calls on FEC to:

1.    oppose the use of contracts for services for staff in adult and community education, and elsewhere in the sector;

2.    seek contracts of employment for members on contracts for services, unless the members do not want contracts of employment;

3.    seek equal treatment for members on contracts for services, including equal access to the Teachers’ Pension Scheme.

FE20A.1      Anti-Casualisation Committee

In point 2, delete all after “seek contracts of employment for members on contracts for services”

FE21  Harrow College     Local branch levies

This Conference welcomes the provision under section 7.3 of the UCU rules, which allows FE branches to collect a local levy, as had been the case for HE branches in the former AUT for many years.

However, this conference regrets the fact that very few FE branches have taken advantage of this opportunity to raise extra funds to support the activities of their branches, since the formation of UCU.

Conference therefore urges all FE branches to recommend to their members at the next AGM, that a local levy of at least 50p per month per member be implemented.

 

 

 

SECTION 8: HIGHER EDUCATION SECTOR CONFERENCE: MOTIONS FOR DEBATE

Paragraph 4, Pay and national negotiations

HE1   Higher Education Committee

In the procedure for electing negotiators:

1.       Delete paragraph F and renumber accordingly.

2.       Add at the end a new paragraph:

“In the event that at the first HEC after Congress one or more of the elected negotiators becomes a vice-chair of HEC, the next electable candidate(s) from the original ballot, taking account of the conditions in Paragraph E, will be substituted.”

HE2   Northern Ireland HE Committee       Bargaining arrangements

Conference recognises that, in the current economic climate, it will be difficult to achieve a substantial catch-up pay settlement.

Conference believes, therefore, that our primary objective must be to assert and defend our right to negotiate effectively on behalf of our members. This means UCU must continue to insist on

1. a distinct and separate bargaining table to negotiate on all matters particular to academic and academic-related staff including pay and pay structures:

2. a negotiating table which does not frustrate our right and ability to take appropriate forms of industrial action should this prove necessary.

Conference instructs HEC and the HE negotiating team to give absolute priority to these objectives.

HE2A.1        Open University

Delete third sentence two bullet points and replace by

‘Conference therefore re-asserts UCU's demand for a permanent, standing sub-committee to negotiate on all matters particular to academic and academic related staff including pay and pay structures as determined by an overwhelming majority voting in a membership ballot.’

Delete last two words and replace by “this objective”.

HE3   Northern Region Committee  Hourly Paid and National HE Negotiations

HESC welcomes the call in the 2009 pay claim for the assimilation of hourly-paid staff across the HE sector under the Framework Agreement, pro-rata permanent contracts, and a minimum hourly rate in the interim. The inclusion of hourly-paid in pre - 1992 universities is a considerable leap forward.

Given the current situation with JNCHES, we call upon the HEC to work vigorously to achieve these aims in national negotiation, and if this cannot be achieved:

i.   To find other ways to move forward in 2009-10, for example, by concentrating extra resources to support individual LAs/branches in making distinctive progress on these points which can be used as models of best practice elsewhere. This could include campaigning support, negotiating support, support for legal cases and support for industrial action.

ii. To work for these policies for hourly paid staff to remain on the national agenda until they are achieved.

Paragraph 6, Framework Agreement

HE4   University of the West of England     Pay for research

Conference notes that only at level 4 of the National Academic Role Profiles is a member of staff “Required to be [an] externally recognised scholar or teacher.”

The high number of level 3 staff who were part of RAE submissions shows the extent to which AC3 staff are working beyond their pay grades.

Conference therefore calls on HEIs to:

a. use appropriate pay grades to acknowledge the work for which the HEI seeks to claim credit; or,

b. acknowledge that their RAE submission was disingenous and exploitative because it included work that was not contractually required by the HEI.

HE5   Canterbury Christ Church University  

          Administrative and other professorships

Conference believes that outstanding academic achievement should be the principal criterion for conferring the title ‘professor’ in universities and colleges. The practice of awarding professorships to administrative post holders who do not fulfil the academic criteria is misleading and should be discontinued. 

Conference also believes the arbitrary use of ‘associate’ or other professorship titles by new and old universities is also misleading and it is better that all permanent members of university faculties should hold the title ‘professor’ on the American model.

 

HE5A.1        Canterbury Christ Church University

Final sentence, add between ‘that’ and ‘all’ – ‘we move towards a position where’

Final sentence, add between permanent and members – the word ‘academic’

Final sentence, after ’university faculties’, delete ‘should’

Paragraph 9, Workload

HE6   Northumbria University  Overworked and Under valued

Conference is alarmed at the staff surveys undertaken in various HEIs recently that are revealing, amongst other things, the amount of unpaid work academic staff are undertaking. In a recent survey carried out by Capita, on behalf of Northumbria University, it was found that 63% of academic staff ‘do not have time to carry out all (their) work’ and 60% are not ‘able to take regular breaks on most days’. Management are using these surveys to as an exercise to align themselves to other HEIs and as long as the results are not too dissimilar, they could continue to ignore the growing trend of work overload.
Conference notes the TUC’s ‘Work your Proper Hours Day’ and calls upon UCU to investigate the extent of overwork amongst its members and to campaign for an acceptable workload in both the pre- and post 92 sectors.

HE7   Higher Education Committee   Campaigning on workload protection in HE 

HESC notes that for some time now management have been steadily increasing UCU members’ workloads using a variety of tactics. In particular members are subject to an increasing pace of change, the pressure to carry out ‘internationally competitive’ research, and increasing student numbers.

These pressures are likely to increase as recession bites.

Workload is an Equality and a Health and Safety Issue, threatening health and reducing quality of life. Additionally, increasing workload is an attack on academic freedom, curbing as it does the time available for free study time and scholarship. HESC urges ROCC to make workload a campaigning priority for the union and recommends to ROCC the HESC working group paper as a basis for the campaign.

HE8   Higher Education Committee                      Workload protection – negotiating guidance for HE branches/local associations

HESC resolves to adopt the workload working group paper as the basis of its strategy to curb the growing workload of members, indeed to reduce it, and to improve conditions of service. HESC notes that the paper was produced in response to a motion to HESC for a workload template and welcomes the approach adopted by the working group in proposing the template as a set of national principles which branches/LAs can use in a practical way to negotiate locally.

HE9   University of Glasgow              Workload Protection

Conference welcomes the UCU Local Negotiating Guide for Workload Protection from HEC while noting that workload models in Universities are becoming increasingly common. Conference notes that any staff engaged in teaching, research or related work has to some extent become aware of workloads increasing while resources of time allocated to perform well, and preserve an effective work-life balance, diminish. This meeting encourages HEC to support branches/LAs to negotiate with management to make workload protection a priority.

Paragraph 10, Redundancy

HE10 University of Dundee      Compulsory redundancies

Conference calls for condemnation of any threat of compulsory redundancies in the HE sector arising out of restructuring of schools, faculties, departments, or units.

Conference calls for the strengthening of efforts to counter attacks on members’ jobs and working conditions , especially in view of the increasing financial pressure on the Higher Education sector.

 

 

Paragraph 11, Governance

HE11           University of East London       

Governance, democracy and business influence

Conference notes:

·         increasing business influence/ decreasing staff and student involvement in governing bodies;

·         the role of such bodies in disseminating ideas about education as a commodity and universities as corporate entities under managerial control;

·         government’s wish to reduce the size of governing bodies and further limit involvement of employee and student representatives.

Conference asserts:

·         the intrinsic value of education and of independent, critical thought;

·         the importance of good governance based upon adequate representation of internal and external constituencies;

·         the key role of transparent procedures in relation to governing bodies.

Conference resolves to:

·         introduce issues of governance into UCU’s Alternative Vision for Higher Education;

·         prepare a statement of principles for good practice in establishing and running governing bodies consistent with UNESCO guidelines on Self Governance and Principles of Collegiality;

·         make the union’s views known to DIUS, HEFCE and other relevant bodies.

HE12 Yorkshire and Humberside Region HE Committee 

Leeds Met – bullying and governance

HESC notes:

1   The removal of the VC of Leeds Met under a cloud of accusations that involve issues of bullying of managers.

2   The UCU survey of 2007 showed a widespread culture of bullying throughout Leeds Met which was denied by management and ignored by the governing body.

HESC welcomes the statements from the Chief Executive of Leeds Met to move towards a more collegiate model of working.

HESC believes that the culture of bullying must be recognised at all levels and must be dealt with using procedures agreed with recognised trade unions.

HESC calls for:

a.  A public inquiry into the governance of Leeds Met and the decision to remove the VC.

b.  A culture change to a more open, democratic and collegiate management of universities.

c. HEC to establish a working party on collegiality and democratic governance and UCU training for staff governors.

HE13 University of Southampton      Call for Independent Body for Dispute       Resolution

This Congress notes that since the Higher Education Act of 2004 came into force, student disputes that escalate beyond internal procedures can be referred to an independent body, the Office of the Independent Adjudicator.
However, by abolishing the Visitor system the Act took away remedies for employee and employee/student disputes, leaving those involved in such complex issues with no recourse but to the courts.

This Congress notes the negative impact of this development on dispute resolution within universities and colleges, and calls for the establishment of an independent body equivalent to the OIA to which such disputes can be referred.

HE13A.1      London Region HE sector

Add as final paragraph:

This conference, noting numerous reported instances of poor grievance procedures and processes in HE, also instructs HEC to commission an audit of grievances procedures and processes in all HE institutions to report by next congress.

Paragraph 12, Equal treatment and pay

HE14 Women’s Standing Committee          Equal pay audits

Higher Education Conference urges branches to press institutions to carry out pay audits and to propose remedial action where problems are identified. In particular, HE Conference notes that existing pay audits have identified starting salaries for academic and related staff and professorial promotion schemes as problem areas. HE Conference instructs the HEC committee to identify best practice in these areas and to make the adoption of good practice a priority for branches.

Paragraphs 13 - 15, Anti-casualisation

HE15 Anti-Casualisation Committee           Hourly Paid, Assimilation and National HE Negotiations

HESC welcomes the call in the HE pay claim for the assimilation of hourly paid across the sector to the pay and grading structures and a commitment to pro-rata permanent contracts. We welcome local successes, but complex issues can place a heavy burden on branch officers.

We call on the HEC to:

1.  work vigorously to achieve the above aims for hourly paid in national negotiations in 2009-10;

2.  work for these policies for hourly paid to remain on the national agenda until achieved;

3.  produce a model assimilation procedure for branches, to include advice on negotiating grading, calculating fractional contracts to include all work done, legislation, monitoring and appeals, EPEV, employee status and examples of good practice

4.  seek opportunities to achieve particular successes with LAs/branches to constitute useful models, by providing resources such as campaigning support, negotiating support, support for legal cases and support for industrial action.

HE16 Open University     Fractional Staff workload calculations

Conference believes that in many institutions the fraction on which the proportion of pay is based for fractional academic or academic related posts needs to be re-examined to ensure that notional hours include time necessary for preparation of study materials, liaison with colleagues and senior academics to ensure high quality teaching and assessment, scholarship, additional reading time in the first year of a course and the additional student support that widening participation has entailed.

Conference asks the HEC to conduct a survey of branches and members on fractional contracts in order to ascertain the extent of the problem, and to prepare relevant negotiating guidelines for branches.

HE17 University of Glasgow    Hourly Paid Staff

Conference notes that some progress in some areas has been made in moving hourly paid staff onto appropriate spinal points, but that considerable further work is still required. This meeting encourages branches/LAs to step up negotiations with management to achieve a fair payment system for all hourly paid staff. This can be supported by activities such as information stalls and recruitment drives amongst appropriate staff.

HE18 Anti-Casualisation Committee           Sustainable Careers for Researchers

Researchers and other fixed-term staff are still being unlawfully and/or automatically dismissed on the termination of their contracts, in spite of the Fixed-Term Regulations, hampering career trajectories. Conference calls on the NEC to work with individual universities, Universities UK, the Funding Councils and other appropriate bodies to promote improved career structures for research staff in Universities, and to:

1.    press universities to develop objective and transparent promotion processes for research staff;

2.    press universities to ensure that research staff have access to the same opportunities for development and remuneration as other academic staff;

3.    oppose unlawful dismissal on the termination of contracts by engaging with the employers, bringing suitable tribunal cases and providing resources and advice to members and LAs/branches;

4.    press Research Councils to find ways to enable researchers to pursue sustainable careers, and

5.    publicise best practice relating to career development and encourage its dissemination and adoption.

HE19 University of Manchester         Less Favourable Treatment – Early Career Research Staff

This Conference notes that the role of Principal Investigator is a critical opportunity for career advancement, and that the current handling of Contract Wording (especially fixed-term contracts) is knocking many early-career researchers out of the career path. We note that the leadership role is usually identified with the first-named Principal Investigator. Early-career researchers cannot compete on equal footing with the permanent staff if some people's contracts specify an ending date. The use of ending dates in contracts is to be avoided as it is irrelevant to the contract terms and conditions. This Conference resolves to explore ways to ensure that permanent contracts are given to all researchers, who have had 1 contract before and who have 4+ years of experience, rather than fishy limited-term contracts which breach the Fixed-Term Contract Regulations (2002).

HE19A.1      University of Manchester

The fifth sentence, replace:

"fishy limited term contracts which breach the Fixed Term Contract Regulations"

with "highly dubious limited term contracts that almost certainly breach the Fixed Term Employees Regulations (2002) and/or the EU Fixed Term Directive of 1999 on which they are based".

HE20 University of Manchester          FTC Staff and serial redundancy

This conference calls on the UCU National Executive Committee to engage in national level discussions with the research councils, HEFCE and UCEA, to urgently address the inadequate responses of many universities to the Ball and Bigott rulings. Confusion reigns in the sector because so many contracts with ending-dates have been issued. The research is continuing at the University level so it is wrong to pick out certain contract researchers and dismiss them with a "redundancy pool of one". This Union resolves to address the uncertainties facing thousands of FTC staff. This union seeks to negotiate with UCEA, the employers, to reach a revised model for funding university research which does not rely on serial redundancy.

HE20A.1      University of Manchester

Second sentence "Confusion reigns in the sector because of so many contracts with ending dates have been issued."

To be replaced with:

"Confusion reigns in the sector because of so many alleged open-ended contracts with reference to end dates/funding have been issued".

HE21 Composite  (Open University, University College London)  Contracts for Services/As and When

Conference notes the important legal distinctions between 'employees' and 'workers' under EU and UK law, and that some HE employers use 'contracts for services' or 'as and when' contracts to define staff as workers rather than employees. This is used to deny rights to redundancy consultation and pay, to maintain a casualised workforce, and to attempt to justify other inequalities; e.g. in pension provision.

Conference calls on HEC to:

·         oppose the use of contracts for services for academic and related staff

·         seek equal treatment and contracts of employment for members on contracts for services seek assimilation for hourly paid staff on contracts for services under the Framework Agreement

·         oppose attempts by employers to refuse assimilation under the Framework Agreement (or even continued work when others are assimilated) on the basis of having issued contracts for services.

HE21A.1 Compositing amendment (University College London):

i    Add to end of first bullet point “who do not want them”

ii   Add to end of second bullet point “, unless the members do not want contracts of employment”

Paragraph 16, Structure and funding of higher education

HE22 West Midlands Region HE Committee        

HEFCE funded undergraduates

HE sector conference calls for the Government-imposed cap on HEFCE-funded undergraduate numbers to be lifted, not only in the interests of extending opportunities to all who can benefit, but also to meet the needs of potential students in a period of recession.
We welcome the proposal to hold a UCU conference on fighting all cuts and redundancies including those arising from this cap.
We call on the HEC to run a campaign for the lifting of the cap on HEFCE-funded student numbers.

HE23 Northumbria University           Course Fees and Equality of Access

Conference calls upon the UCU to keep up the pressure on the government to resist the removal of the cap on student top up fees, with a long term aim of abolishing top up fees altogether. Already universities are positioning themselves as market leaders, ready to charge the upmost possible. We know the distortions that markets create. Universities have a responsibility to serve the local population as well. The North East has the lowest levels of the population entering higher education in England and many of the post ’92 sector HEIs cater for students from predominately BME backgrounds. The impact of raising course fees will impact upon the wider community and must be resisted.

HE24 Higher Education Committee            Forthcoming government review of variable tuition fees

Conference believes:

·         the primary aims of higher education are the provision of advanced learning and the pursuit of knowledge;

·         higher education produces social as well as economic benefits for individuals and society;

·         higher education should be based on a student’s ability to benefit from their studies not on their ability to pay;

·         tuition fees have undermined the widening participation agenda and led to the further marketisation of our sector.

Conference restates its principled opposition to tuition fees and will vigorously oppose any attempt to raise the fee cap.

Conference also calls for: 

·         increased resources for higher education to be funded though progressive taxation;  

·         improved maintenance grants, including a national bursary scheme;

·         equal treatment for part-time students and the re-establishment of public funding for all ELQ places;

·         a proper independent review of funding, covering teaching, research and student support.

HE25 University of Brighton, Falmer          Investing in Higher Education

HESC

·         notes the harmful consequences to individuals, families and communities of unemployment;

·         believes that universities have an important part to play in economic and social regeneration, and in the development of a more just and inclusive society;

·         calls for the doors of learning to be opened to the unemployed through the dramatic expansion of the Access system, and for state funding preparatory education to be made available so that unemployed people can return to education, either full-time or part-time, without loss of benefits.

HE25A.1      Manchester Metropolitan University

Add following point to end of motion:
Demands that national government massively increases the funding of HE as part of an economic crisis strategy that puts people before profit.

HE26 Composite: Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee, Northern Region Higher Education Committee, East Midlands Regional Committee

         Government Capping on Student Recruitment

HE Sector Conference notes:
1. Predictions of a huge surge in youth unemployment as a result of the economic crisis.
2. UCAS applications up 8.8% this year.
3. Predictions that up to 30,000 university applicants could fail to find university places next academic year due to the cap on recruitment.
4. The failure in the Government's budget to address the current funding crises in HE.

HE Sector Conference recognises that post-16 education is a crucial means of education, training and re-training in the economic recession.

HE Sector Conference demands that:
1. The ELQ funding regulations be immediately scrapped.
2. The cap on HE student places be immediately removed and appropriate funding for increased numbers of students be put in place, under a managed national plan for expansion.
3. That the Government makes available sufficient funding to halt the madness of departmental and course closures and prevent mass redundancies of staff in HE.

HE27 Yorkshire and Humberside Region HE Committee 

Defending the international character of the university workforce

HESC notes:

1. The dependence of UK HE on academics from overseas.

2. The importance to the vitality of UK HE of freedom of movement of academics internationally.

3. Current international job losses and subsequent mass resistance

4. Government bailouts for bankers contrasting with refusal to protect jobs

5. Strike action against contractors exploiting European legislation to undermine pay and conditions

HESC:

1. Reiterates support for: equal pay (at the higher rate where workers from different countries are involved); binding national agreements negotiated by TUs; equal legal status for all regardless of nationality; workers’ right to work abroad; academic freedom; and free interchange worldwide.

2. Condemns ‘contracting out’ and privatisation.

3. Applauds action to defend jobs but believes the slogan “British jobs for British workers” only divides, undermines and even destroys academia, advantages the bosses, the BNP fascists and all those hostile to the trade union movement.

HE27A.1      Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee

At end of resolution add new point 4:

'notes the divisive and damaging effects of the PBSI (points based system of immigration) on the international movement of academics'.

 

 

 

HE27A.2      University of Dundee

Add at end

Condemns the requirements to monitor attendance of international students and staff as racist, an example of attempts to witchhunt and is an attack on academic freedom of expression

Commits UCU to campaign against monitoring of staff and students in Higher Education

After paragraph 19, as part of professional issues

HE28 Higher Education Committee            Points Based System for Immigration

HESC strongly condemns the Points Based System for immigration (PBS). It is against our core values of academic freedom and equality and we believe this legislation should be repealed. HESC notes with concern the implications on the contractual terms of academic and related staff, on working conditions, on staff/student relations, and the risk of members being exposed to legal sanctions for non-compliance.

HESC notes the existing campaigning activity within UCU on the legislation and instructs HEC to:

·         Work with the Equality Committee and the Equalities Unit, ROCC and the Campaigns team, colleagues in FE and others within UCU to monitor the effects of this legislation on our members in HE and to formulate advice and guidance for branches.

·         Highlight the contractual and workloads issues that will arise for our members in HE

·         Campaign with other appropriate organisations against the negative consequences of the legislation.

HE28A.1      University of Edinburgh

Add at the end:
Further, Conference calls upon members, wherever there is sufficient unity and determination, to seek union support to refuse to change their working practices in ways which would facilitate the operation of the new law, and which would compromise our educational role by our becoming an extension of the immigration system.

HE29 Queen’s University Belfast       Probation

Conference notes the intensification of demands being placed on academic staff on probation and instructs the HEC to:

·         Carry out a survey of existing practice in pre- and post- 92 institutions with a view to identifying good practice in terms of support given to staff on probation and profiles to be achieved in different disciplines for confirmation in post;

·         Work to establish a national agreement on probation which ensures that demands being placed on probationary staff can reasonably be achieved within the current timescales and are not contrary to agreed role profiles;

·         Initiate a campaign that highlights the increasing workload being placed on early career academics and provide support for branches in pursuing these campaigns.

HE30 Higher Education committee    Vision for higher education

Conference deplores the creeping erosion of the ideals of education, free thought and autonomy that underpin higher education. UCU will continue to assert the ideals that are a central component of our professional identity and rights as workers.

Further conference notes the DIUS ‘debate’ on the future of higher education in England. Conference is concerned about the lack of staff involvement in the process and the endorsement of an instrumentalist, business-dominated ‘framework for higher education’. 

Conference calls on the HEC:                                                 

·         to campaign for ‘real universities’ based on the principles of academic freedom, collegiality and institutional autonomy, independent scholarship and research, and equality and internationalism;  

·         to develop policy papers based on those principles which will be to frame UCU responses to future government reviews; 

·         to work with ROCC to produce campaigning materials for different audiences;

·         to feed into the development of UCU’s alternative vision for post-school education. 

HE30A.1      Canterbury Christ Church University

          Add an extra bullet point after the first of the four:

• to promote and support the declaration of the 20th May as an annual International Academic Freedom Day

Paragraph 20, Academic related

HE31 Academic-Related Staff Committee   Academic-related career progression

Conference states that Academic Related staff make an essential professional contribution to our institutions.  Job evaluation methodologies do not adequately recognise the value of this contribution.  The employer’s reliance on re-grading based on job evaluation rather than promotion following professional development is to the detriment of those following an academic related career path.

Conference instructs HEC, with the support of the Academic Related Committee, to produce campaigning materials relating to academic related staff in support of equality of opportunity for progression, development and career progression alongside academic colleagues.  This should include access to training, professional development and progression through the relevant academic related grades.

 

 

 

Paragraph 28, Privatisation

HE32 London Region HE Sector Committee 

Oppose IT Restructuring and Outsourcing

Conference notes that:

·         IT systems ranging from email to bespoke research computing services are critical to the function of modern universities,

·         In the pre-92 HE sector these are often managed by UCU members

·         In the credit crunch large IT suppliers are leading ‘charm offensives’ to encourage outsourcing of many services and the shift towards proprietary knowledge and cloud computing. At the same time universities are facing financial pressures and ‘managerial initiatives’ to become ‘more efficient’

Conference believes the presence of on-site trained, supported, accountable IT staff are essential in a modern university.

Conference resolves that UCU should:

·         Derive model guidance including agreements to ensure that reviews or potential restructuring of IT services include early, extensive consultation with the staff providing the services.

·         Monitor the sector for instigation of any such initiatives, publicise them, and treat them as seriously as it has attempts to privatise teaching.

HE33 Academic-Related Staff Committee  Outsourcing

IT professionals on campus aim to provide a level of service that is tailored specifically to the exacting requirements of students and staff. IT services play a key role in supporting learning, teaching and research across our institutions. It is testimony to the dedication and expertise of these AR staff that a high level of service has been maintained through a period of increased demands coupled with reduced staffing levels and an ever-diminishing budget.

Conference believes that the moves of institutions to outsource some core IT services, including email, is a damaging step which has serious implications for data protection, data integrity and audit control.

Conference reaffirms its opposition to privatisation and instructs HEC to collect data from institutions where this has already occurred and to produce campaign material to defend IT services and calling for appropriate funding levels.

HE34 Manchester Metropolitan University            Privatisation and marketisation in HE

Sector conference congratulates those branches and associations like Essex University, Goldsmiths College and Manchester Metropolitan University, which successfully resisted privatisation attempts.

Sector conference recognises:

1. That despite economic crisis the threat of privatisation in higher education has not diminished;
2. That the ideological bankruptcy of neo-liberalism has not deterred Labour from pressing on with disastrous attempts to commodify HE;
3. That privatisation may appear an attractive option to institutions claiming to be in financial crisis;
4. The consistent and effective support from UCU’s campaigns team to branches resisting threats of privatisation.

Sector conference encourages local organisations to draw on available best practice in resisting privatisation and marketisation, to seek joint action with other campus unions, and to use all means of resistance including strike action in the knowledge that by doing so they are fighting to protect members’ pay and conditions, educational quality and academic freedom.

HE35 Composite (North West Region HE Committee; University of Brighton, Eastbourne)

Campaign against privatisation in Higher Education

Conference notes:

1.    The continuing attempts by private providers like INTO University Partnerships, Kaplan and Navitas to secure contracts in HE institutions to offer academic and support services;

2.    The successful campaigns at Essex University, Goldsmiths, University of London and Manchester Metropolitan University resulting in the scrapping of plans for joint venture partnerships.

Conference believes that:

1.    University managements are likely to consider privatisation strategies to cope with financial insecurity;

2.    Higher education is not a commodity to be delivered by ‘business-facing’ universities;

3.    Universities have a responsibility to explore and implement in-house options for the delivery of services.

Conference calls on the NEC:

1.    To continue its campaign against the marketisation of HE;

2.    To organize a high-profile public campaign amongst staff and students against further privatisation of the university sector and for increased public funding as a necessary response to the recession.

HE35A.1      University of Liverpool

Add to section "Conference calls on the NEC:" after points 1 and 2

3. To inform the membership of the threat of privatisation to intellectual property rights of academics, the autonomy and development of public sector postgraduate and undergraduate degrees, the identity of HE institutions, the rigorousness of quality assurance on degrees and institutions.
4. To highlight the dangers of the private business model in relation economic and political conditions.

HE36 West Midlands Region HE Committee         Partial Privatisation of undergraduate provision

We note with concern the discussions between Keele University and Study Group International which may lead to a partial privatisation of undergraduate provision.

Conference pledges its support to colleagues at Keele University fighting this initiative, confirms its opposition to the transfer of Higher Education provision to the private sector and mandates the HEC to:

a) collect information about any similar proposals elsewhere;
b) support all UCU members fighting privatisation;
c) update the campaign pack against privatisation; and
d) continue to lobby Government to recognise the dangers of privatisation and the benefits of publicly-funded Higher Education.

Paragraph 29, Stress and bullying

HE37 North West Region HE Committee    Unacceptable student feedback

Conference notes the concern regarding evidence, particularly in North West Region, of unsolicited, inappropriate and often anonymous criticism by students of academic staff via text messages, social networking sites and pigeon-hole post-cards.

Conference believes that this is a form of bullying which cannot be tolerated.

Whilst Conference supports and encourages legitimate student feedback, Conference believes that this needs to arise from negotiated and agreed processes in order to be fair and effective.

Conference resolves:

1.    To instruct HEC to liaise with NUS and other appropriate organisations with a view to ending this illegitimate and disparaging practice before it becomes an embedded norm;

2.    To instruct HEC to publicise this practice to the wider membership and advise members to report institutions where this occurs

3.    To offer support to members who have suffered as a consequence

Paragraph 32, Local disputes

HE38 University of Liverpool            Departmental Closures at Liverpool

This Conference condemns the proposal which has gone before Senate at the
University of Liverpool calling for the closure of the Departments of Philosophy
and Politics & Commmunication Studies and the Statistics and Operational Research
division of the Department of Mathematics and threatening the closure of a
further five departments. Conference pledges support for members at Liverpool.
Conference reasserts that research is an integral part of the role of an
academic and instructs HEC to oppose both the proposed closures of departments
and courses and any move to force staff currently on full academic contracts
onto teaching-only contracts.

HE38A.1      Manchester Metropolitan University

Add following paragraphs to end of motion:
Congress congratulates the magnificent, angry demonstration by over a thousand staff, students and residents against the cuts in March.
Congress resolves to provide all necessary industrial, political and financial support to future demonstrations, campaigns and industrial action in opposition to job losses, course and departmental closures in HE.

After paragraph 36, new paragraph, Other issues

HE39 Northern Region HE Committee        The Recession and HE Funding

Conference calls upon the government to make a formal pledge that it will not impose cuts in real terms on higher education funding in the course of the on-going recession.

The Universities are essential to the future of the knowledge based economy. Therefore, we call upon the government to increase spending on the nation's universities as an investment in future economic success and social well being, and to expand the funding for the creation of new and additional full time academic positions throughout the system. Such increases in funding for higher education are compatible with a strategically well targeted fiscal stimulus in the context of the current economic recession.

HE40 University College London      

Investing in Higher Education – Widening Participation

Conference notes
1. the harmful consequences of unemployment to individuals, families and communities.
2. that, faced with an economic crisis, President Obama is arguing to widen participation in the US HE sector, whereas Prime Minister Brown is calling for cuts in places.

Conference believes that Universities have an important part to play in economic and social regeneration and the development of a more just, democratic and inclusive society.

Conference resolves
1. to call for a major expansion of UK state funding for Higher Education as part of the government's response to the economic crisis.
2. to demand the government fully funds places to allow unemployed people to return to education with entry on the basis of merit, without loss of benefits.

HE41 Higher Education Committee  Ratification of local collective agreements

HESC calls upon HEC to develop policies and procedures regarding the ratification of local collective agreements where these have regional and/or national implications.

HE42 South East Region HE Sector Committee, University of Brighton (Grand Parade and Moulsecoomb)        Ratification of Agreements

Recognising that all local collective agreements will have Regional and national implications, HESC calls upon HEC to develop a policy and procedures for the oversight and national ratification of local collective agreements.

HESC urges all Branches and Local Associations to ensure participation in the mapping of Regional patterns of salaries and conditions, and in the framing of Regional strategies for the achievement of the generalisation of the best terms and conditions across the Region.

 

 

9       MOTIONS NOT ORDERED INTO THE AGENDA

 

I        Motions submitted after the deadline not considered to meet the criteria for late motions

II       Motions not approved in accordance with Congress standing orders

III      Motions not considered in order for decision by Congress

IV      Motions and amendment submitted to sector conference, considered to be the business of Congress

V        Amendments not ordered into the agenda

VI      Original text of composited motions

 

I        MOTIONS RECEIVED AFTER THE MOTIONS DEADLINE, NOT CONSIDERED TO MEET THE CRTIERIA FOR LATE MOTIONS

 

B1     University of Hull   Commercial managerialism

Congress, alarmed at the behaviour of senior management in some universities, instructs the Executive to develop advice and support  for local associations and branches to take action to prevent the further polarization of university management towards small select senior management teams that are unaccountable to the staff and increasingly to the governing bodies.

B2     University of Hull   Fixed-term contracts

Congress instructs the UCU National Executive  

a) to represent to the secretary of state and the chair of the  [relevant] Select Committees the concerns we have that university managements have squandered time and resources on seeking to circumvent the 2002 Employment Regulations, and have deliberately denied recognition of the continuing contract status of staff; and

b) to report back to the membership on the action Government intends to take to bring such practices to a halt and to initiate a campaign in the absence of action.

B3     Bromley College of F&HE

This Congress re-affirms the need for greater professionalism within the Further Education (FE) sector but believes this can only be achieved through closing the pay gap between the compulsory sector and FE, and through meaningful professional development and qualifications. This Congress, therefore, calls upon the UCU National Executive Committee to organise a national campaign against mandatory membership of the Institute for Learning (IfL) by calling on all UCU members to boycott the IfL by:

(a)  lapsing membership once government support ends; and

(b) refusing to complete any direct debit or standing order forms issued by IfL in order to maintain membership levels; and

(c) calling on those outside the UCU, but in the FE sector and subject to forced membership of IfL, to join this campaign of passive resignation.”

B4     London Region FE Committee

FE conference notes the advertisements appearing in the May press for trainee/assessors and the potential dangers that any increase in the use of these posts could pose to educational provision and to the terms and conditions of FE teachers.

We therefore agree to:

·            Defend full curriculum learning that meets students’ needs and aspirations

·            Oppose the growth of  ‘tick box’ education

·            Oppose all attempts to introduce trainee/assessor roles in colleges to the detriment of learning and/or teachers’ terms and conditions.

·            Organise a nationally co-ordinated campaign to highlight these dangers and to build co-ordinated opposition

·            Build the strongest possible unity with Unison and other FE unions around this programme.

 

 

II      MOTIONS NOT APPROVED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CONGRESS STANDING ORDERS

B5     University of Salford      Zero Hours Contracts

Congress deplores the practice of rogue employers using zero hours contracts to evade their responsibilities under the 2002 Fixed Term Employees (Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations, and calls on UCU to take legal action to close this loophole by taking a case to the European Court of Justice if necessary.

 

 

B6     Sheffield College            Changes to the FE pay year

In the context that

·         FE colleges generally, do not receive definitive learner numbers or funding allocations until much later in the academic year

·         FE colleges generally, no longer make nationally recommended pay awards covering 1st August to July 31st

Conference asks that the FE Committee

·         Acknowledge that local implementation of national pay awards would have one less complication if the pay year were to be brought in line with definitive funding allocations

·         Decide that the pay year should be changed to run from 1st February to 31st January

·         Instructs the FE negotiators to pursue an interim 18 month Pay Award as soon as is practicable so that the pay year can be changed without members losing ‘back pay’

B7     New College Nottingham         Role of Local Education Authorities

Conference notes that the funding of 16 – 19 education will soon become the responsibility of local education authorities. Whilst college principals may hope and expect that this will simply mean a change in administration, UCU FE Sector Conference welcomes this as an opportunity for more democratic control over what happens in FE Colleges. There are many examples of how our opinions would differ from those of the AoC both nationally and locally. It is essential that the relevant politicians hear those views.
UCU should engage in a campaign to lobby appropriate councillors and MPs to articulate our view of how funding should be organised.

 

III     MOTIONS CONSIDERED NOT IN ORDER FOR DECISION BY CONGRESS

B8     University of Glasgow    UCU Staff Conditions

Congress acknowledges the hard work and dedication of UCU's full time officials, administrators and office staff. Their commitment and dedication has enabled UCU to defend member's terms and conditions. In keeping with best practice, and to establish UCU as a family friendly employer, this meeting instructs UCU national executive to ensure that no UCU employee is obligated to work out with normal office hours and that meetings and events which require staff support are scheduled during the normal working week.

 

 

 

 

IV      MOTIONS AND AMENDMENT SUBMITTED TO SECTOR CONFERENCE CONSIDERED TO BE THE BUSINESS OF CONGRESS

Submitted to FE sector conference:

B9     South East Region FE Committee

          Motion FE9 – additional final bullet point:

·         continue work towards a merger with the NUT.

B10   College of North East London  Fractionalisation

Conference notes that:

·         The marketisation of education continues to drive casualisation. The deeper the crisis of the free market system, the greater the impact on casualised lecturers and the more urgent the need to win parity of pay and conditions.

·         Through effective local organisation and employment law, collective claims present the best opportunity of winning fractionalisation for a significant number of both HE and FE casualised staff.

Conference believes that:

·         Where negotiation has been exhausted, the fight against casualisation cannot wait on the employers’ goodwill.

·         Collective grievance procedures can both help win fractionalisation and provide an effective recruiting tool among casualised staff.

Conference calls for:

·         A guide to organising and pursuing collective claims for fractionalisation of casualised staff and parity of conditions

·         A series of national and regional briefings for branch officers and reps to promote collective grievance organisation

B11   West Midlands Region FE Committee          Anti Academies

Conference notes the corrosive effect of the extension of the Governments Academies program. Academies fly in the face of social justice and widening participation in education. Conference congratulates those regions that have successfully fought off this form of creeping privatisation of education. Conference resolves to –

·         Maintain the broad alliance with Anti-Academy pressure groups

·         Reiterate its opposition to FE and HE establishments and all other
private sponsors of Academies

·         Continue the campaign against all attempts to privatise education

B12   City and Islington College Camden Road      Injury to one is an Injury to All

Conference notes:

1.    The current international jobs slaughter

2.    Mass resistance to job losses in France, Greece, Spain, Ireland

3.    Government  bailouts for bankers but their refusal to protect jobs

4.    Strike action against contractors exploiting European legislation to undermine pay and conditions, fuelled by the bosses’ neoliberal economic agenda

5.    The slogan ‘British jobs for British workers’, welcomed by the right wing press and  the BNP, and the dangerous sentiments underlying it.

Conference:

a.  Reiterates support for equal pay, binding national agreements negotiated by TUs, equal legal status for all regardless of nationality. All workers’ right to work abroad.

b. Condemns ‘contracting out’ and privatisation which uses competition to drive down workers’ pay and conditions.

c.  Applauds action to defend jobs but believes the above slogan can only divide working class communities and advantage the bosses, the BNP fascists and all those hostile to the trade union movement.

B13   London Region FE Committee (late motion)

FE Conference notes that:

a) CNWL members have delivered 3 days strike action, progressively with increasing members' participation in response to the National pay dispute relating to harmonisation.

b) Its members have sacrificed 3 days' pay so far.

c) Despite this action and negotiations involving local and National Officers, management are still not prepared to implement the pay agreement in full without strings. Even with strings, it is only prepared to implement an award if the Inner London Allowance is replaced by the Outer London Weighting.

Conference agrees to sanction 3 days industrial action on full sustentation, with days to be selected by the branch committee to achieve maximum impact. This action and any further action necessary to achieve full implementation without strings will be supported by a National Levy of £10.

 

Submitted to HE sector conference:

B14   Manchester Metropolitan University           

          Campaigning for fractionalisation in HE

Sector conference notes that:

1) The marketisation of education continues to drive casualisation. The deeper the crisis of the free market system, the greater the impact on casualised lecturers and the more urgent the need to win parity of pay and conditions.

2) Through effective local organisation and employment law, collective claims present the best opportunity of winning fractionalisation for a significant number of HE casualised staff.

Sector conference believes that:

1) Where negotiation is exhausted, the fight against casualisation cannot wait on the employers’ goodwill.

2) Collective grievance procedures can both help win fractionalisation and provide an effective recruiting tool among casualised staff.

Sector conference calls for:

1) A guide to organising and pursuing collective claims for fractionalisation of casualised staff and parity of conditions

2) A series of national and regional briefings for branch officers and representatives to promote collective grievance organisation.

 

Submitted to FE [and HE] sector conferences in identical or almost identical form:

B15   Disabled Members’ Standing Committee     Promoting disability equality

Conference welcomes the progress achieved by the Disability Equality Implementation Group (DEIG) in its first year in advancing the recommendations of the Commission for Disabled Staff in Lifelong Learning (CDSLL).

Conference notes that pressure from disabled activists, in concert with committed branches, is crucial to DEIG’s strategy of firstly gaining an explicit Disability Commitment linked to the CDSLL recommendations from college principals [Vice Chancellors] and the CEOs of key sector organisations, and secondly translating that commitment into a genuine transformation of culture.

Conference therefore calls on UCU to:

1.  fully support the DEIG, ensuring the active involvement of both the Equality Unit and disabled members;

2.  task Regional Officials and Branch Development Officers to promote disability equality linked to the recommendations of the CDSLL via local training

3.  produce campaigning materials for branches to encourage institutional uptake of the Disability Commitment, to stimulate genuine culture change, and disability equality.

B16   Black Members’ Standing Committee          Points based immigration

Conference condemns the introduction of the points-based immigration system and attempts to make workers in all sectors into informants against colleagues from outside the European Economic Area.

Colleges and universities are being forced to police the movements of international students and staff. International staff and students must register with ID cards at their colleges and universities.

International staff form an essential part of world-class research teams and their teaching expertise enhances the education of all students.

Conference deplores this pandering to anti-immigrant racism. Placing barriers before international students and staff to enter the country undermines the reputation of UK education irreparably.

Conference calls for FEC [HEC]:

·         To work with the campaign against the implementation of the new system;

·         To lobby government to explain the detrimental impact on key sectors;

·         To continue working with NUS and other relevant groups to continue the campaign against ID cards.

B17   Black Members’ Standing Committee          British National Party

Conference believes the British National Party is a fascist party which seeks to create an all white Britain. The BNP has a history of violence and criminal activity and does not hesitate to employ such tactics in pursuit of its goals. As the BNP gains ground electorally they will try to spread a message of hatred and division targeting key areas of the country. 

UCU members must combat the rise of the BNP alongside our fellow trade union sisters and brothers. UCU is affiliated nationally to Unite Against Fascism and has proudly hosted this anti-fascist organisation for a number of years at our London base at King’s Cross.

Conference calls for:

·         A properly resourced and concerted drive to ensure branches and local associations affiliate locally to UAF and/or all appropriate anti-fascist organisations.

·         Branches work collaboratively with other unions and community organisation to progress the anti-fascist agenda

B18   LGBT members’ standing committee          Equality Impact Assessments

Equality impact assessments (EIA) provide a useful tool with which to (a) ascertain whether or not the equality agenda is being pursued in FE [HE] institutions and (b) ensure that such institutions are in compliance with the law on equality duties. EIAs are also a useful tool in terms of industrial relations bargaining, in the sense that management policies, practices and plans can be challenged, delayed or even thwarted by insisting that an EIA is conducted. FE [HE] Sector Conference calls upon the FEC [HEC] to work with the Equality Unit in the revision, publication and distribution of the September 2007 “Implementing the Equality Duties”. This should be distributed to all branch officers and equality training should be organised in all regions covering good practice in implementing equality and how to use EIAs within FE institutions. The document and training should cover all equality strands.

 

B19   LGBT members’ standing committee          Sexual Orientation in Further Education

Following the publication of the research report by the Centre for Excellence in Leadership - Equality and Sexual Orientation: The Leadership Challenge for Further Education (2006) – and the DVD training resource – Visible and Valued (2008) – Further Education Sector Conference calls upon FEC to work with the Equality Unit to ensure that all FE branches obtain a copy of these resources, plus practical training on how to use them. [following the completion of the ECU research into the situation in the HE sector, a practical resource, plus training on how to use it, is produced, disseminated and delivered to all HE branches].

 

V       AMENDMENTS NOT ORDERED INTO THE AGENDA

B20   Amendment to motion 47  Lambeth College

In the light of pay disparity, this Conference agrees to call for a reduction in pay for all Principals, to not more than twice that of lecturers’ pay.

 

B21   Amendment to motion 53  West Midlands Regional Committee       

Delete all after ‘Rule 17.2’ and insert:

Delete “Sector Conferences”.

Delete "or in an aggregation of members in institutions/central groups/ regional retired members` branches in accordance with rule 17.1" and insert “or in the case of institutions/ central groups/ regional retired members’ branches with fewer than 100 members, by aggregation of members in institutions/central groups/ regional retired members` branches"

Insert new Rule 17.3

The number of members from institutions/central groups/regional retired members’ branches for meetings of Sector Conferences shall be one for every 100 members (or part thereof) in an institution/central group/regional retired members’ branch up to a maximum of six members from, as appropriate, each institution/central group/regional retired members’ branch.

Re-number existing Rule 17.2.1 as Rule 17.4 and insert ‘and Sector Conferences’ at end of first sentence.

Re-number existing Rule 17.3 as Rule 17.5 and insert ‘and Rule 17.3’ after ‘Rule 17.1’ in second sentence.

 

B22   Amendment to motion 65  Northern Regional Committee

          To address the specific issues of health educator members, including contracts, DOH budget cuts, and recruitment as set out in NOP priority 5, through the establishment of a 'Health Educators Advisory Group'. This group would act as a bridge between the existing JLC sister unions and the HEC to progress essential work. The group will consist of up to 2 health educators from each region, NEC representation and officials and meet three times a year.

 

B23   Amendment to motion 67  Canterbury Christ Church University

Insert new paragraph at the end: ‘Congress also welcomes the continuing and increasing level of co-operation between UCU and the National Union of Teachers at national and local level and calls on the NEC to encourage further co-operation with ALL education unions and to investigate the possibility of a united education union incorporating all existing sectional unions’.

 

 

B24   Amendment to motion 67  South East Regional Committee

Insert new paragraph at the end: 'Congress also welcomes the continuing and increasing level of co-operation between UCU and the National Union of Teachers at national and local level and calls on the NEC to encourage further co-operation with the NUT at Regional and local level through the NOP and continue to investigate the possibility of a merger with the NUT'.

 

B25   Amendment to motion FE16  Westminster Kingsway

Add: ‘We welcome the draft guidelines on the question of observations but believe they need to be made more precise and it should be national policy to have:

a)            The same incidence of observations for all

b)            Notification of the lesson slot to be observed

 

VI  ORIGINAL TEXT OF COMPOSITED MOTIONS

Composite motion 1

 

C1 Northumbria University  The economic recession and the equality agenda

Congress notes the danger that economic recession can be exploited to attack equal rights and the advances made by women and minority groups.

It notes with concern that job losses in retail, hotels and catering may particularly affect women and minority ethnic groups. It condemns any scapegoating of asylum seekers, ethnic minorities and women and any political propaganda that attempts to blame oppressed groups for the economic crisis. It particularly opposes attempts by far right groups such as the British National Party to exploit and build upon low morale in communities and reaffirms UCU commitment to Unite Against Fascism.

Congress commits itself to vigilant defence of UCU’s equality agenda and of equal rights achieved to date.

C2     National Executive Committee           The economic recession and the equality agenda

Congress notes the danger that economic recession can be exploited to attack equal rights won by women and ethnic minority groups.

It notes with concern that job losses in the public sector, retail, hotels and catering may particularly affect women and minority ethnic groups.

Congress notes that job losses in the education sector will threaten access to and the quality of education.

It condemns any scapegoating of asylum seekers, ethnic minorities and women and any political propaganda that attempts to blame oppressed groups for the economic crisis.

Congress commits itself to vigilant defence of UCU’s equality agenda and of equal rights achieved to date.

 

Composite motion 21

C3     East Midlands Regional Committee  United Campaign Against Police Violence

Congress Notes:
1. The tragic death of Ian Tomlinson on 1 April after being pushed to the ground by police involved in the G20 protests.
2. There have been numerous complaints against police violence and restrictions on recent demonstrations.
3. Many families, who have lost loved ones at the hands of the police, are involved in long campaigns for justice.
4. The formation of the United Campaign Against Police Violence (UCAPV), set up around the slogans “Remember Ian Tomlinson – no more deaths in police custody” and “Freedom to protest – defend civil liberties”.

Congress Believes:
1. Evidence suggests that aggressive police behaviour is not the result of individual officers, but is an institutional issue.
2. There is a need for a broad-based active campaigning strategy around these questions.

Congress Resolves:
1. To support UCAPV and future actions it is involved with.
2. To affiliate to UCAPV.

C4      Northern Regional Committee   United Campaign Against Police Violence

As C3 above (East Midlands Regional Committee), plus ‘including kettling’ at end of bullet point 2 in paragraph 1.

C5     Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee  United Campaign Against Police Violence

As C3 above (East Midlands Regional Committee), plus ‘at a cost of £100’ at end of bullet point 2 in paragraph 3.

C6      University of Leeds   United Campaign Against Police Violence

UCU Congress resolves to affiliate to the United Campaign against Police Violence, in order to “to remember Ian Tomlinson and those who died in police custody, and to campaign for the right to protest and the defence of civil liberties.”

Composite motion 24

C7      National Executive Committee Solidarity with Palestine

Congress endorses the actions of the General Secretary and SFC in relation to the implementation of Motion 25.

Congress condemns the recent Israeli military attacks on Gaza, The continuing blockade of the Gazan people and the occupation of the West Bank highlight the importance of international union solidarity with the Palestinian people. Congress also condemns the use of rockets against Israeli civilians.

Congress welcomes the progress on twinning and exchanges with international post-school education unions and institutions including those in Palestine and supports the continuation of this solidarity work and other solidarity work within the law.

C8      Westminster-Kingsway College         Twinning with Palestine

This Congress notes the success of the national twinning with Palestine movement in raising awareness of the ongoing military occupation in the West Bank and blockade of Gaza. We welcome the role of groups such as Camden-Abu Dis Friendship Association in building links between educational institutions here and in the occupied territories. We call on UCU nationally to affiliate to the national twinning campaign.

C9     Derwentside College      UN International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian people

Congress notes that 29 November each year is designated United Nations International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People and instructs the NEC to promote activities in the branches – both curricular and non-curricular – to mark this day.

Composite motion 28

C10    Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee            Gaza

Congress notes:
1. The death and destruction caused by the Israeli government’s assault on Gaza.
2. The sale of over £18.8 million of British arms to Israel in 2008, up from £7.5 million in 2007.
3. Student occupations in protest at the Gaza situation.

Congress condemns:
1. The Israeli attack on Gaza and refusals by the US and UK governments to condemn it.
2. The Israeli siege of Gaza in breach of international law.
Congress resolves:
1. To congratulate student unions who have occupied and protested over Gaza.
2. To call for an immediate lifting of the siege.
3. To demand the British Government end its complicity in denying Palestinian rights.
4. To support a ban on import of goods from the illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied Territories.
5. To demand the British Government condemns Israeli aggression and bans arms sales and economic support for Israel.
6. To send a donation to the special Stop the War fund for Gaza.

C11    North West Regional Committee       Gaza

Congress notes:

·          The appalling loss of life, injuries and destruction caused by the Israeli government’s assault on Gaza;

·          The sale of more than £18.8 million worth of British arms to Israel in 2008, up from £7.5 million in 2007.

Congress condemns:

·          The Israeli attack on Gaza;

·          The total support for Israel by the US government;

·          The siege of Gaza by the Israeli government in breach of international law

Congress resolves:

·          To call for an immediate lifting of the siege;

·          To support self-determination for the Palestinian people;

·          To call for a ban on imports of all goods from the illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied Territories;

·          To demand the British government expels the Israeli ambassador;

·          To demand the British government bans arms sales and economic support for Israel; 

·          To donate to the special Stop the War fund for Gaza.

Composite motion 29

The following motions C12, C13 and C14 did not appear in the first report of the Congress Business Committee. The union received advice from Leading Counsel that to print these motions would be unlawful because they would be likely to be viewed by a court as a call to boycott Israeli academic institutions. The union has previously followed advice from Leading Counsel that such a call would be outside the powers of the union to make.

 

C12    University of East London        Palestine – international solidarity

Congress notes:

·          targeting of civilians, homes, hospitals, UN facilities, university and school buildings to overthrow a democratically elected government;

·          blockade of medicine, food, fuel, trade and education of Gaza, and continued occupation and settlement of the West Bank;

·          complicity of Israeli educational institutions in colonisation and military preparation;

·          student occupations globally demanding justice and solidarity.

Congress believes:

·         a solution is impossible until Israel dismantles illegal settlements, withdraws to 1967 borders, and negotiates with Hamas;

·         international pressure is necessary to force Israel to abide by international law.

Congress affirms support for the Palestinian call for a boycott, divestment and sanctions campaign.

Congress resolves to:

·         intensify solidarity and renew urgently its call to members to reflect on the moral and political appropriateness of collaboration with Israeli educational institutions;

·         host an Autumn international, inter-union conference of BDS supporters to investigate implementation of the strategy, including an option of institutional boycotts.

C13   University of Brighton (Grand Parade)         International Solidarity, Palestine and Gaza

Congress notes the

·       targeting of civilians, schools, homes, hospitals, UN facilities, and universities to overthrow a democratically elected government;

·       blockade of medicine, food, fuel, trade and education of Gaza, and continued occupation and settlement of the West Bank;

·       complicity of Israeli educational institutions in colonization and military preparation;

·       student solidarity occupations globally, demanding justice.

Congress believes:

·          no solution is possible until Israel dismantles illegal settlements, withdraws to 1967 borders, and negotiates with Hamas;

·          international pressure is necessary to force Israel to abide by international law.

Congress affirms support for the Palestinian call for a boycotts, disinvestment and sanctions (BDS) campaign.

Congress resolves to:

·          intensify solidarity and renew urgently its call to members to reflect on the moral and political appropriateness of collaboration with Israeli educational institutions;

·          host an Autumn 2009 international, inter-union conference of BDS supporters to investigate the implementation of the strategy, including an option of institutional boycott.

C14    College of North East London           Gaza

Congress notes

·          The targeting by Israel of civilians, schools, homes, hospitals, UN facilities and universities to overthrow a democratically elected government in Gaza

·          The blockade of medicine, food, fuel, trade and education of Gaza, and occupation and settlement of the West Bank

·          The complicity of Israeli educational institutions in colonization and military preparation

Congress believes

·          No solution is possible until Israel dismantles illegal settlements, withdraws to 1967 borders, and negotiates with Hamas

·          International pressure is necessary to force Israel to abide by international law

Congress resolves to

·          Support the Palestinian call for a Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign

·          Support those Israelis who refuse to collaborate with Israel’s war against Palestinians

·          Demand that the British Government condemn Israeli aggression and ban arms sales to Israel

·          Host an Autumn 2009 international, inter-union conference of BDS supporters to investigate implementing the strategy

Composite motion 30

C15     West Midlands Regional Committee                   Points based immigration

Congress condemns the points-based immigration system that attempts to make all workers into informants against migrant colleagues.
Colleges and Universities are being forced to police the movement of international students and staff – or loose the ability to recruit internationally. International students must register with ID cards at their institutions although those institutions have no system to store or monitor this information.

International staff and students form an essential part of world class teaching and research. This system makes educators into immigration snoopers which could damage UK education irreparably.

Congress deplores this pandering to anti-immigration racism and agrees to:

·       Campaign against the implementation of the points-based immigration system

·       Lobby Government to explain the detrimental impact on key sectors

·       Work with all relevant groups to continue the campaign against ID cards

C16    National Executive Committee         Points Based Immigration

Congress strongly condemns points based immigration, which requires international staff and students to carry biometric ID cards and institutions to monitor them, report absences to the Home Office and check biometric data bases.

Congress believes PBI is:

1. Discriminatory and an attack on the civil liberties of international staff and students.

2. Likely to lead to draconian absence and sickness policies being introduced and members being disciplined if they do not report absences of international staff and students. 

3. Likely to severely damage the international status, and quality of education and research in institutions due to the loss of overseas staff and students.

4.  Counter to our core values of academic freedom and equality.

5. Not part of our duties.

Congress instructs NEC to campaign jointly with S/TUC, NUS, employers, and other organisations to put pressure on the government to repeal this legislation. 

C17   Academic-Related Staff Committee      Points Based System for Immigration

Under the Points Based System for Immigration, HE and FE Institutions are mandated to have a UK Border Agency sponsor’s licence effectively making them agents of the Home Office.

As a result individual UCU members (both academic and academic-related) will be required to carry out policing and surveillance duties on behalf of the Home Office. Individuals could be liable to substantial fines and possible jail sentences for failure to comply.

This UK Border Agency-directed policy will impose additional workloads on UCU members and will ride roughshod over any individual’s moral objections to collaborating in such distasteful surveillance activities.

This Congress calls on UCU to urgently lobby all relevant bodies and individuals to secure short-term amendments of PBS legislation to ensure that UCU members are released from the existing requirements to act as unpaid and unconsulted agents of the UK Border Agency, and longer term to have the legislation repealed.

Composite motion 42

C18    National Executive Committee           Stress

Congress is outraged, but not surprised, at the unacceptably high stress levels found by the 2008 stress survey to which 14,000 members responded. Congress instructs Executive to draw up a programme of action, which focuses on collective approaches to challenging stress, including:

1.    Regional workshops on campaigning against stress

2.    A pilot campaign together with the local branches in targeted universities, colleges and prison education with particularly high stress levels.

3.    Publicising and distributing the Stress Toolkit and the results of the survey.

4.    Action on workloads, including the negation of agreements at national, regional and branch/LA level.

5.    The production of materials on stress to be used in recruitment.

6.    Collection of information and dissemination of good tactics and success stories in combating stress.

7.    The use of health and safety legislation and health and safety reps.

8.    The production of a report of progress to 2010 Congress.

 

 

C19    National Executive Committee          Stress

Congress notes the UCU Stress Survey Reports and is disturbed, but not surprised, to note that respondents reporting:

i)   high or very high stress levels, are 48% in HE, 55% in FE and 62% in prison education (PE);

ii)  stress levels that are always or often unacceptable, are 33% in HE, 38% in FE and 43% in PE.

The official HSE questionnaire shows that HE, FE and PE respondents fall far below the HSE "aspirational benchmark" of well-being on the factors of: Demands; Control; Managerial Support; Peer Support; Relationships; Role; Change.

Congress considers that the situation in all sectors is shameful, dysfunctional and unacceptable, and instructs the Executive:

a) to take appropriate action to assist Branches to press effectively to reduce stress levels, and to increase well-being on each of the HSE factors;

b) to carry out surveys at regular intervals, and to report back to Congress to chart progress.

Composite motion 45

C20 Chesterfield College          Defending Pensions

Congress notes:

1) The threats made to Public Sector Pensions by sections of the media, politicians and the "pensions industry"

2) The attempt by the media to divide public and private sector workers over pensions.

3) The pressure on final salary and defined contribution pensions as a result of the economic crisis.

4) The recent attacks made on Irish public sector pensions by the 'pension levy' and the vigorous campaign to defence pensions mounted by Irish workers.

Congress believes that pensions represent deferred earnings and that any attempt to restrict pensions rights are a direct attack on workers' wellbeing.

Congress resolves to instruct the NEC to coordinate with other trade unions to launch a powerful united campaign to defend pension rights of workers across the public & private sectors.

C21   City and Islington College Camden Road  Public Sector Final Salary Pensions

Congress believes that final salary pensions for public sector workers must be defended against all attacks. At a time when taxpayers have been given no choice about their own money being pumped into bailouts for banks and financial services to rescue the “top end of town” it would add further insult to injury for public sector workers, who serve the public good for much less financial reward, to have their pension rights attacked.

Congress calls upon UCU to:

·          Publicly oppose any suggestion  that public sector final salary pension schemes be either closed, have their benefits reduced or employee contributions increased.

·          Convene or join a campaign with other public sector unions and the TUC to defend, from any attacks, public sector final salary pension schemes.

 

Composite motion 67

 

C22 University of Brighton, Moulsecoomb           The NOP and Bargaining Strategies

Congress resolves that, using the NOP, the NEC and sub-committees initiate a 'levelling up' campaign involving the:

·          identification of best pay and conditions regionally, and regional patterns of divergence from national agreements or sectoral trends;

·          forging of FE and HE regional committees into cohesive and informal bodies that devise regional industrial strategies in conjunction with the regional office staff;

·          organisation and mobilization of branches in regional campaigns of negotiations and industrial action to level up pay and conditions to the best available

C23    South East Regional Committee        The NOP and Bargaining Strategies

Congress notes the:

·          success of the NOP in beginning the enhancement of departmental and institutional representation, unfolding universal training programmes, and coordinating recruitment activity;

·          Branch Development Organiser appointments soon to cover all Regions, and the national coordination of NOP-related work of regional offices;

·          on-going refinement of regional maps of local agreements in FE and HE sectors, and the mapping of membership densities within and between institutions.

Congress resolves that, using the NOP, the NEC and sub-committees initiate a ‘levelling-up’ campaign involving the:

·          identification of best pay/conditions regionally, and regional patterns of divergence from national agreements or sectoral trends;

·          forging of FE and HE Regional Committees into cohesive and informed bodies that devise regional industrial strategies in conjunction with the regional office staff;

·          organisation and mobilisation of Branches in Regional campaigns of negotiations and industrial action to level up pay/conditions to the best available.

 

 

Composite motion 76 and compositing amendment 76A.1

 

C24    Deeside College

Congress congratulates members in Wales on their successful campaign to restore the 7.4% funding cuts. It welcomes the Welsh Assembly Government decision to increase this years budget by £9m. However Congress utterly condemns fforwm and those Welsh colleges who have made it clear that they will still press ahead with redundancies despite the Assembly's decision. Furthermore Congress fully endorses UCU Cymru's decision to urge all Welsh branches facing compulsory redundancies to ballot for strike action and agrees to pay sustentation at £50 per day. Congress also endorses Wales FESC decision to organise national lobbies outside affected colleges to support striking colleagues.

C25    Coleg Morgannwg Compulsory Redundancies in Wales

Congress congratulates UCU Wales on its successful campaign to reverse FE funding cuts. It welcomes the decision by the Welsh Assembly Government to increase funding by nearly £9m, aimed at negating any need for redundancies.

Congress therefore condemns those colleges which have refused to withdraw the threat of compulsory redundancies.

Congress endorses the decision by UCU Wales to urge any Welsh branches facing the threat of compulsory redundancies to immediately ballot members for industrial action, up to and including strike action.

Composite motion 77

 

C26    East Midlands Regional Committee  Jobs for all

1) We celebrate diversity in our colleges, our schools, and our communities

2) Teachers, private and public sector workers, unemployed and students are stronger when they are united

3) Workers are right to fights cuts

4) ‘British Jobs for British Workers’ is a nationalist slogan that divides workers and fuels racism. This deflects the real anger over unemployment and cuts away from the bosses, politicians and bankers

5) Billions of pounds of taxpayers money has disappeared to bail out the bankers. This money is for education and public services

6) Estimates suggest the recession will leave 3 million unemployed

7) The gutter press attempts to divide employed workers against unemployed workers, private sector against public sector workers, and ‘British Worker’ against ‘Foreign Worker’

Congress believes that an injury to one is an injury to all, and in jobs and education for all. We will not let race, nationality or status divide us.

 

 

C27   Manchester Metropolitan University  Unity to fight for Jobs and Education

Congress notes:
1) We celebrate diversity in our colleges, our schools, and our communities
2) Teachers, private and public sector workers, unemployed and students are stronger when they are united
3) Workers are right to fights cuts
4) ‘British Jobs for British Workers’ is a nationalist slogan that divides workers and fuels racism. This deflects the real anger over unemployment and cuts away from the bosses, politicians and bankers
5) Billions of pounds of taxpayers money has disappeared to bail out the bankers.
6) Estimates suggest the crisis will leave 3 million unemployed
7) The gutter press attempts to divide employed workers against unemployed workers, private sector against public sector workers, and ‘British Worker’ against ‘Foreign Worker’

Congress resolves to:

a) Raise the slogans ‘an injury to one is an injury to all’, ‘jobs for all’ and ‘education for all’
b) Resist division based on race, nationality or status.

Composite motion 81

 

C28   Anti-Casualisation Committee  Collective grievances and campaigning for fractionalisation

Congress notes:

·         The marketisation of education continues to drive casualisation. The deeper the crisis of the free-market system, the greater the impact on casualised staff and the more urgent the need to win parity of pay and conditions.

·         Through effective local organisation and employment law, collective claims present the best opportunity of winning fractionalisation for a significant number of both HE and FE casualised staff.

We believe:

·         Where negotiation has been exhausted, the fight against casualisation cannot wait on the employers’ goodwill.

·         Collective grievance procedures within institutions can both help win fractionalisation and provide an effective recruiting tool among casualised staff.

Congress calls for:

·         A guide to organising and pursuing collective grievances for fractionalisation of casualised staff and parity of conditions

·         A series of national and regional briefings for branch officers and representatives to promote collective grievance organisation.

 

 

C29    University of Dundee     Campaigning for hourly-paid staff

Conference notes that:

·         The marketisation of education continues to drive casualisation and increase the negative impact on hourly paid lecturers.

·         Hourly paid lecturers may not be provided with written terms and conditions of employment, often fail to have their hourly rate increased with the annual pay award and miss out on incremental progression.

Conference believes that:                       

·         Where negotiation has been exhausted, the fight for equal treatment and against casualisation cannot wait on the employers’ goodwill.

·         Collective grievance procedures can both help win fractionalisation and provide an effective recruiting tool among casualised staff.

Conference calls for:

1. Local branches to campaign in support of hourly paid lecturers and for their move to fractionalised contracts.

2. The organising and pursuing of collective claims for fractionalisation of casualised staff and parity of conditions

3. A series of national and regional briefings for branch representatives to promote collective grievance organisation.

Composite motion FE2

C30    City and Islington College (Camden Road) Stopping the Break-Up of        Further/Adult  Education

Conference notes:

1. Leitch Review/Train to Gain.

2. Recent survey shows 50% of large companies training budgets will be cut.

3. The government 14- 19 strategy / Machinery of Government proposals.

Conference believes:

1. The government’s strategy based upon Leitch, no longer fits in light of rising unemployment.

2. The 14 – 19 strategy will continue to roll out the market into education and, along with raising the school leaving age, will not meet the needs of young people.

Conference resolves:

1. To oppose the 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals.

2. To campaign for F/A Education to be fully brought back under LA control, including governance with regional overarching structures. 

3. To campaign for real planning of F/A Education, a broad curriculum and training based upon general, vocational and transferable skills, and not just  “skills” .

4. To campaign for statutory rights to paid educational leave and to workplace training committees.

C31    Barnsley College   Stopping the Break-up of Further/Adult Education

FE Sector Conference notes:

1) The Leitch Review and Train to Gain

2) A recent survey shows that 50% of large company training budgets will be cut

3) The government’s 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals. 

Conference believes:

1) The government’s strategy, based on the Leitch Review, no longer fits in a period of rising unemployment.

2) The 14-19 strategy will continue to increase the role of the market in education and, along with raising the school leaving age, will not meet the needs of young people. 

Conference resolves:

1) To oppose the 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals

2) To campaign for Further and Adult Education to be brought back under Local Authority control, including governance with regional overarching structures

3) To campaign for real planning of Further and Adult Education, a broad curriculum and training based on occupation and not skills 4) To campaign for statutory rights to paid educational leave and for workplace training committees.

Composite FE2 and compositing amendment FE2A.1

C32    Further Education Committee  The Future of Further and Adult Education

Conference believes:

1) The Government’s strategy based upon Leitch and demand led funding is out of step with the economic and social situation.

2) The 14-19 strategy continues to roll out the market into education, will not meet the needs of young people, and undermines the chances of developing a fair education system that meets students’ needs.

We have serious reservations about the 14-19 strategy and Machinery of Government proposals, continue to oppose a compulsory raising of the school leaving age and a market driven system.

We resolve to campaign for:

1) F/A Education to be returned to democratic LA control, including governance, with regional overarching structures with democratic involvement of teachers, parents and local community organisations

2) Real planning of F/A Education, a broad curriculum and training based upon aspiration and students needs, not an employer-led agenda.

3) Statutory rights to paid educational leave and workplace training committees.

 

Composite motion FE6

C33    Yorkshire and Humberside Region FE Sector Committee        New Build

FE Sector Conference deplores the fact that many FE colleges have been put into financial difficulties because of the government’s encouragement of new build.

We note that where new build has taken place, despite new technology and some showpiece features, the pressure to maintain financial security has resulted in a worsening of pay and conditions for staff and damage to the quality of education.

While we welcome investment in FE colleges we demand that the government puts financial support in place to maintain the quality of FE for both staff and students. FE should be prioritised for investment during the recession so that we have a generation prepared to face the new challenges of the future.

C34    Oxford and Cherwell Valley College                     FE College building programme

Conference notes:

·         The poor physical state of some of the buildings in the sector because of lack of investment in the past

·         The decision of the LSC to delay making decisions on funding new buildings causing uncertainty in the sector

·         The possible financial penalties that colleges will incur as a result of the delay as building costs escalate and value of land declines

·         The loss of space in many of the new builds and fears for the quality of the building programmes

·         The risk that the new buildings are focused on the marketing aspect of attracting new students rather that the quality of the teaching and learning environment

·         The risk that refurbishment of existing buildings could be neglected

·         The risk that PFI type schemes will increasingly be used as a substitute to direct public sector funding

Conference demands that FE building programmes, where needed, should be fully planned and funded.

 

Composite motion FE15

 

C35    Lambeth College            Workload

This Conference agrees that UCU should initiate a strong national campaign of action over workload, stress and bullying, including industrial action if necessary. The marketisation of education has encouraged a management ethos defined by hollow notions of “economies of scale” and “cost efficiency” and other jargon, used to erode the human element in teaching and working conditions for teaching and support staff.
We propose that UCU adopt a campaign on workload similar to that of the successful NUT campaign a few years ago.
We agree to campaign alongside Unison and NUS to demand that administrative, student welfare, and other support staff posts which have been lost to cuts, are reinstated.

C36    Richmond upon Thames College       Workload

Sector conference believes that workload is a major issue facing our members and that in future, with all work-related tasks, we should ask: (a) Does it need to be done, and (b) If so, does it need the skills of a trained teacher. If A applies, but not B, the work should be covered by college support staff.

We further agree to:
1 Make workload a central campaigning issue
2 Call for this issue to be a regular feature in our magazine
3 Publicise all victories and best practice
4 Organise regional conferences where activists can share experiences, outline priorities and discuss plans of action.

C37    Barnsley College            Workloads

FE Sector Conference notes that:

1) Workloads are out of control and are a major issue in FE.

2) A bureaucratic education structure and culture of testing and monitoring are harming our members’ health and students’ learning.

3) The success of the NUT’s campaign on workloads.

4) Public sector workers work on average 7 hours a week of unpaid overtime.

5) The narrow criteria of success in education concentrating on employability and skills and neglecting community cohesion and the learning experience.

 6) Teachers, parents and the community have little say in how our colleges are run and what they are for. 

Conference proposes to: 

1) Organise meetings on “Another education is possible”.

2) Call a national day of action on “Workloads red alert – let us teach!”

3) Call a protest at the Learning and Skills council.

4) Produce a toolkit for branch reps “Fighting workloads; getting organised”.

C38    Chesterfield College       Workloads

FE sector notes
1. Workloads are out of control and a major issue in FE
2. A bureaucratic education structure and culture of testing and monitoring are harming our member's health and students learning.
3. The successes of the NUT’s national campaign on workloads
4. Public sector workers work on average 7 hours a week of unpaid overtime
5. The narrow criteria of success in education limited to employability and skills neglecting community cohesion and the learning experience
6. Teachers, parents, students and the community have little say in how our colleges are run and what they are for.

FE sector proposes
1. To roll out Manifesto meetings 'Another education is possible?'
2. Call a national day of action 'Workloads red alert - let us teach!'
3. To call a protest at the Learning Skills Council
4. Produce a toolkit for branch reps 'Fighting workloads; getting organised'

Composite motion HE21

 

C39    Open University    Contracts for Services

HESC notes the important legal distinctions between 'employees' and 'workers' under EU and UK law, and that some HE employers use 'contracts for services' to define staff as workers rather than employees. This is used to deny rights to redundancy consultation and pay, to maintain a casualised workforce, and to attempt to justify other inequalities, e.g. in pension provision.

HESC calls on HEC to:-

·         Oppose the use of contracts for services for academic and related staff.

·         Seek equal treatment and contracts of employment for members on contracts for services.

·         Seek assimilation for hourly paid staff on contracts for services under the Framework Agreement

·         Oppose attempts by employers to refuse assimilation under the Framework Agreement (or even continued work when others are assimilated) on the basis of having issued contracts for services

Composite HE20 and compositing amendment HE20A.1

C40    University College London       Contracts for Services/As and When

Conference notes the important legal distinctions between 'employees' and 'workers' under EU and UK law, and that some HE employers use 'contracts for services' or 'as and when' contracts to define staff as workers rather than employees. This is used to deny rights to redundancy consultation and pay, to maintain a casualised workforce, and to attempt to justify other inequalities.

Conference calls on HEC to:

·         oppose the use of contracts for services for academic and related staff who do not want them

·         seek equal treatment and contracts of employment for members on contracts for services, unless the members do not want contracts of employment

·         seek assimilation for hourly paid staff on contracts for services under the Framework Agreement

·         oppose attempts by employers to refuse assimilation under the Framework Agreement (or even continued work when others are assimilated) on the basis of having issued contracts for services.

Composite motion HE26

C41   Yorkshire and Humberside Regional Committee   Budget and shortage of university places

HE Sector Conference notes:
1. Predictions of a huge surge in youth unemployment as a result of the economic crisis.
2. UCAS applications up 8.8% this year.
3. Predictions that up to 30,000 university applicants could fail to find university places next academic year due to the cap on recruitment.
4. The failure in the Government's budget to address the current funding crises in HE.

HE Sector Conference recognises that post-16 education is a crucial means of education, training and re-training in the economic recession.

HE Sector Conference demands that:
1. The ELQ funding regulations be immediately scrapped.
2. The cap on HE student places be immediately removed and appropriate funding for increased numbers of students be put in place, under a managed national plan for expansion.
3. That the Government makes available sufficient funding to halt the madness of departmental and course closures and mass redundancies in HE.

C42   Northern Region Higher Education Committee   Government Capping on Student Recruitment

Conference notes:
1. Predictions of a surge in youth unemployment as a result of the economic crisis.
2. UCAS applications up 8.8% this year.
3. Predictions that up to 30,000 university applications could fail to find university places next academic year due to the cap on recruitment.
4. The failure in New Labour's Budget to address the funding crisis in HE.
Conference recognises the post-16 education is a crucial means of education, training and re-training in the economic recession.
Conference demands that:
The cap on HE student places be immediately removed and appropriate funding be put in place both for increased numbers of students and to prevent redundancies of staff in HE.

C43    East Midlands Regional Committee   Cap on HE student places

Conference notes:
1. Predictions of a huge surge in youth unemployment as a result of the economic crisis
2. UCAS applications up 8.8% this year
3. Predictions that up to 30,000 university applicants could fail to find university places next academic year due to the cap on recruitment
4. The failure in New Labour’s Budget to address the current funding crises in HE

Conference recognises:
that post-16 education is a crucial means of education, training and re-training in the economic recession.

Conference demands that:
1. The ELQ funding regulations be immediately scrapped
2. The cap on HE student places be immediately removed and appropriate funding for increased numbers of students be put in place
3. That New Labour makes available sufficient funding to halt the madness of departmental and course closures and mass redundancies in HE.

Composite motion HE35

C44   North West Region HE Committee 

Campaign against privatisation in Higher Education

Conference notes:

1    The continuing attempts by private providers like INTO University Partnerships, Kaplan and Navitas to secure contracts in HE institutions to offer academic and support services;

2    The successful campaigns at Essex University, Goldsmiths, University of London and Manchester Metropolitan University resulting in the scrapping of plans for joint venture partnerships.

Conference believes that:

1    University managements are likely to consider privatisation strategies to cope with financial insecurity;

2    Higher education is not a commodity to be delivered by ‘business-facing’ universities;

3    Universities have a responsibility to explore and implement in-house options for the delivery of services.

Conference calls on the NEC:

1       To continue its campaign against the marketisation of HE;

2       To organize a high-profile public campaign amongst staff and students against further privatisation of the university sector and for increased public funding of Higher Education as a necessary response to the recession.

C45    University of Brighton, Eastbourne  Campaigning against Privatisation

HESC notes

·         continuing attempts by private providers, like INTO, KAPLAN and Navitas, to secure contracts in HE institutions to offer academic and support services;

·         successful campaigns at Essex and Goldsmiths and University of London which defeated joint venture partnership plans with INTO;

·         increased dangers of relying on private companies and market principles given the deepening recession;

·         that university managements are likely to consider privatisation strategies to cope with financial insecurity.

HESC affirms that

·         Higher Education should not be a commodity delivered by ‘business-facing’ universities;

·         Universities have a responsibility to ex implement in-house options for service delivery.

HESC resolves to call on the HEC:

·         to continue to campaign with the CORT team against the marketisation of HE;

·         to organise a high-profile public campaign amongst staff and students across the sector against privatisation in HE, and for increased public funding in the context of the recession.