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More jobs to go at University of Salford

5 June 2013 | last updated: 10 December 2015

Another 46 posts at risk in the 13th round of job losses in less than two years • Salford is the UK's most prolific university when it comes to job cuts

More staff at the University of Salford face losing their jobs as the institution announced a staggering thirteenth round of job cuts in under two years today.

The University and College Union (UCU) said strike action could not be ruled out following the latest round of cuts, which will see 46 jobs go. The union is meeting with the vice-chancellor tomorrow (Thursday) and said there will need to be progress on avoiding compulsory redundancies and withdrawing inferior redundancy terms if the threat of strike action is to disappear.

The university has imposed inferior terms and conditions that allow only a 45-day consultation period for those affected by job losses (slashed down from the previous 90 days) when more than 100 staff are at risk - as was the case with last month's job cuts announcement.

UCU head of higher education, Michael MacNeil, said: 'The University of Salford won't shake off its unenviable tag as Britain's most prolific university for axing staff by making even more job cuts. Staff have understandably had enough of such a cavalier approach to their livelihoods and the slashing of their terms and conditions. It's little surprise they are now considering strike action.

'The university desperately needs a proper strategic plan to deal with its current difficulties, not resort to imposing inferior redundancy terms and slashing more jobs. We are pleased the vice-chancellor has agreed to meet us tomorrow. However, he must agree a new approach if the serious threat of strike action is to go away.'

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