General secretary election: your choice

Support colleagues fighting back in FE!

Staff vote for strike action at Hull College

30 September 2016

Members of UCU at Hull College have voted in support of strike action over planned redundancies.

More than eight in ten members (86%) who voted backed strike action, while 96% voted in favour of action short of a strike. The branch will meet on Monday (3 October) to discuss next steps.

The college plans to make 141 redundancies, which come on top of recent rounds of redundancies that have already seen 385 jobs lost since 2011.

The latest plans will result in up to 60 lecturers losing their jobs. Courses will be closed in subjects including IT, horticulture, public services and hospitality. Beauty students at Goole have been told that they will have to make a 30 mile trip to Hull to complete their course as the provision is closing at Goole.

All three college nurseries will also be closed, and jobs will go in essential services including the library and learning support. Several UCU branch officers are at risk of redundancy.

The union said that the plans would reduce valued local access to several courses, and warned that cutting library and learning support facilities would diminish the student experience.

UCU regional official, Julie Kelley, said: 'This ballot result clearly shows the level of anger amongst staff, who have already been demoralised by successive rounds of redundancies. The decision to strike is never taken lightly, but staff feel they have been left with no alternative.

'Despite cutting almost 400 staff in five years, the college management is rushing into yet more job losses without fully considering other options. It's also deeply concerning that several UCU branch officers are affected by this latest round of redundancy proposals.

'Closing courses and cutting facilities will reduce access to education for local people and diminish the student experience. We are urging the college to halt these damaging plans and work with UCU to find alternatives to more job losses.'

Comments